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ACP Best Practice No 181: Chemical pathology clinical investigation and management of nephrolithiasis.
J Clin Pathol 2005; 58(2):134-40JC

Abstract

Renal stones have afflicted humans for millennia but there is still no solution to this problem. This review discusses the laboratory and metabolic aspects of the clinical management of patients with renal stones, both primary and secondary in origin. First, non-pharmacological interventions such as increased fluid intake, decreased protein consumption, dietary changes in sodium, calcium, oxalate, potassium, purine, vitamins, and essential fatty acids are considered. Then specific pharmacological treatment to modify urine calcium, oxalate, urate, citrate, and acidity are considered. Finally, more unusual types of stone are examined.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Clinical Chemistry Department, Queen's Hospital, Burton on Trent, Staffordshire, UK. tim.reynolds@burtonh-tr.wmids.nhs.uk

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15677531

Citation

Reynolds, T M.. "ACP Best Practice No 181: Chemical Pathology Clinical Investigation and Management of Nephrolithiasis." Journal of Clinical Pathology, vol. 58, no. 2, 2005, pp. 134-40.
Reynolds TM. ACP Best Practice No 181: Chemical pathology clinical investigation and management of nephrolithiasis. J Clin Pathol. 2005;58(2):134-40.
Reynolds, T. M. (2005). ACP Best Practice No 181: Chemical pathology clinical investigation and management of nephrolithiasis. Journal of Clinical Pathology, 58(2), pp. 134-40.
Reynolds TM. ACP Best Practice No 181: Chemical Pathology Clinical Investigation and Management of Nephrolithiasis. J Clin Pathol. 2005;58(2):134-40. PubMed PMID: 15677531.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - ACP Best Practice No 181: Chemical pathology clinical investigation and management of nephrolithiasis. A1 - Reynolds,T M, PY - 2005/1/29/pubmed PY - 2005/3/8/medline PY - 2005/1/29/entrez SP - 134 EP - 40 JF - Journal of clinical pathology JO - J. Clin. Pathol. VL - 58 IS - 2 N2 - Renal stones have afflicted humans for millennia but there is still no solution to this problem. This review discusses the laboratory and metabolic aspects of the clinical management of patients with renal stones, both primary and secondary in origin. First, non-pharmacological interventions such as increased fluid intake, decreased protein consumption, dietary changes in sodium, calcium, oxalate, potassium, purine, vitamins, and essential fatty acids are considered. Then specific pharmacological treatment to modify urine calcium, oxalate, urate, citrate, and acidity are considered. Finally, more unusual types of stone are examined. SN - 0021-9746 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15677531/full_citation L2 - http://jcp.bmj.com/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=15677531 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -