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Beliefs, attitudes, and practices of breastfeeding mothers from a periurban community in South Africa.
J Hum Lact 2005; 21(1):31-8JH

Abstract

The aim of this study was to document the breastfeeding practices, beliefs, and attitudes of periurban South African lactating mothers with infants younger than 6 months. None of the mothers (n = 115, mean age 26 +/- 6.3 years) reported exclusively breastfeeding their infants, with complementary breastfeeding being the most practiced (78%) feeding mode. Complementary foods were fed to 32% of infants by their first month of life. Perceived inadequate production of breast milk was the most common (90%) reason cited for adding foods and liquids to breastfeeds. Mothers valued use of traditional herbal preparations (muthi), with more than half (56%) of the infants having received their first dose of muthi before 1 month of age. Our study provides important data on breastfeeding practices of women living within resource-poor settings. Development of successful infant-feeding interventions aimed at promoting overall infant health can benefit from knowledge of these breastfeeding patterns.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Medical Research Council, Cape Town, South Africa.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15681633

Citation

Sibeko, Lindiwe, et al. "Beliefs, Attitudes, and Practices of Breastfeeding Mothers From a Periurban Community in South Africa." Journal of Human Lactation : Official Journal of International Lactation Consultant Association, vol. 21, no. 1, 2005, pp. 31-8.
Sibeko L, Dhansay MA, Charlton KE, et al. Beliefs, attitudes, and practices of breastfeeding mothers from a periurban community in South Africa. J Hum Lact. 2005;21(1):31-8.
Sibeko, L., Dhansay, M. A., Charlton, K. E., Johns, T., & Gray-Donald, K. (2005). Beliefs, attitudes, and practices of breastfeeding mothers from a periurban community in South Africa. Journal of Human Lactation : Official Journal of International Lactation Consultant Association, 21(1), pp. 31-8.
Sibeko L, et al. Beliefs, Attitudes, and Practices of Breastfeeding Mothers From a Periurban Community in South Africa. J Hum Lact. 2005;21(1):31-8. PubMed PMID: 15681633.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Beliefs, attitudes, and practices of breastfeeding mothers from a periurban community in South Africa. AU - Sibeko,Lindiwe, AU - Dhansay,Mohammed Ali, AU - Charlton,Karen E, AU - Johns,Timothy, AU - Gray-Donald,Katherine, PY - 2005/2/1/pubmed PY - 2005/3/15/medline PY - 2005/2/1/entrez SP - 31 EP - 8 JF - Journal of human lactation : official journal of International Lactation Consultant Association JO - J Hum Lact VL - 21 IS - 1 N2 - The aim of this study was to document the breastfeeding practices, beliefs, and attitudes of periurban South African lactating mothers with infants younger than 6 months. None of the mothers (n = 115, mean age 26 +/- 6.3 years) reported exclusively breastfeeding their infants, with complementary breastfeeding being the most practiced (78%) feeding mode. Complementary foods were fed to 32% of infants by their first month of life. Perceived inadequate production of breast milk was the most common (90%) reason cited for adding foods and liquids to breastfeeds. Mothers valued use of traditional herbal preparations (muthi), with more than half (56%) of the infants having received their first dose of muthi before 1 month of age. Our study provides important data on breastfeeding practices of women living within resource-poor settings. Development of successful infant-feeding interventions aimed at promoting overall infant health can benefit from knowledge of these breastfeeding patterns. SN - 0890-3344 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15681633/Beliefs_attitudes_and_practices_of_breastfeeding_mothers_from_a_periurban_community_in_South_Africa_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0890334404272388?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -