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Symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in adults with restless legs syndrome.
Sleep 2004; 27(8):1499-504S

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the occurrence of symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults with restless legs syndrome (RLS), normal controls, and controls with insomnia.

SETTING

University-based hospital.

METHODS

The occurrence and severity of current ADHD symptoms were determined in a prospective study of sequential adult patients with RLS (n = 62) or insomnia (n = 32) and adult controls (n = 77) using Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) ADHD criteria, the Brown Attention-Deficit Disorder (ADD) Scale for adults, and a structured psychological interview. RLS severity was assessed using the International RLS Study Group Rating Scale (IRLS).

RESULTS

Only 1 experimental subject had previously been diagnosed with ADHD. More RLS patients (26%) than insomnia patients (6%) or controls (5%) had ADHD symptoms using age-adjusted total DSM-IV ADHD scores (P < .01). The mean Brown ADD score was greater in RLS patients (37 +/- 28) than in patients with insomnia (24 +/- 18) or controls (21 +/- 18) (P < .01). The RLS symptom severity (0-40 scale) was greater in RLS patients with ADD symptoms (26 +/- 9) than in those without ADD (21 +/- 10) (P < .04). Of the subjects with a Brown ADD score > 40, all reported ADD symptoms in 2 settings, and the majority had had ADHD symptoms since childhood. For subjects with a Brown ADD score > 40, there were no differences between the RLS, insomnia control, and normal control groups in quality of life or the level of anxiety or depression.

CONCLUSIONS

ADHD symptoms are more common in RLS patients than in patients with insomnia or controls. RLS leg discomfort or poor quality of sleep may theoretically lead to hyperactivity and lack of concentration. Alternatively, RLS and ADHD may be part of a single symptom complex, and dopaminergic deficiency may play a role in both disorders.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Piscataway 08854, USA. mlwagner@rci.rutgers.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15683140

Citation

Wagner, Mary L., et al. "Symptoms of Attention-deficit/hyperactivity Disorder in Adults With Restless Legs Syndrome." Sleep, vol. 27, no. 8, 2004, pp. 1499-504.
Wagner ML, Walters AS, Fisher BC. Symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in adults with restless legs syndrome. Sleep. 2004;27(8):1499-504.
Wagner, M. L., Walters, A. S., & Fisher, B. C. (2004). Symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in adults with restless legs syndrome. Sleep, 27(8), pp. 1499-504.
Wagner ML, Walters AS, Fisher BC. Symptoms of Attention-deficit/hyperactivity Disorder in Adults With Restless Legs Syndrome. Sleep. 2004 Dec 15;27(8):1499-504. PubMed PMID: 15683140.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in adults with restless legs syndrome. AU - Wagner,Mary L, AU - Walters,Arthur S, AU - Fisher,Barbara C, PY - 2005/2/3/pubmed PY - 2005/5/6/medline PY - 2005/2/3/entrez SP - 1499 EP - 504 JF - Sleep JO - Sleep VL - 27 IS - 8 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine the occurrence of symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults with restless legs syndrome (RLS), normal controls, and controls with insomnia. SETTING: University-based hospital. METHODS: The occurrence and severity of current ADHD symptoms were determined in a prospective study of sequential adult patients with RLS (n = 62) or insomnia (n = 32) and adult controls (n = 77) using Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) ADHD criteria, the Brown Attention-Deficit Disorder (ADD) Scale for adults, and a structured psychological interview. RLS severity was assessed using the International RLS Study Group Rating Scale (IRLS). RESULTS: Only 1 experimental subject had previously been diagnosed with ADHD. More RLS patients (26%) than insomnia patients (6%) or controls (5%) had ADHD symptoms using age-adjusted total DSM-IV ADHD scores (P < .01). The mean Brown ADD score was greater in RLS patients (37 +/- 28) than in patients with insomnia (24 +/- 18) or controls (21 +/- 18) (P < .01). The RLS symptom severity (0-40 scale) was greater in RLS patients with ADD symptoms (26 +/- 9) than in those without ADD (21 +/- 10) (P < .04). Of the subjects with a Brown ADD score > 40, all reported ADD symptoms in 2 settings, and the majority had had ADHD symptoms since childhood. For subjects with a Brown ADD score > 40, there were no differences between the RLS, insomnia control, and normal control groups in quality of life or the level of anxiety or depression. CONCLUSIONS: ADHD symptoms are more common in RLS patients than in patients with insomnia or controls. RLS leg discomfort or poor quality of sleep may theoretically lead to hyperactivity and lack of concentration. Alternatively, RLS and ADHD may be part of a single symptom complex, and dopaminergic deficiency may play a role in both disorders. SN - 0161-8105 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15683140/Symptoms_of_attention_deficit/hyperactivity_disorder_in_adults_with_restless_legs_syndrome_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/sleep/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/sleep/27.8.1499 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -