Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Risk of childhood germ cell tumors in association with parental smoking and drinking.
Cancer. 2005 Mar 01; 103(5):1064-71.C

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The etiology of childhood germ cell tumors (GCT) is not well understood. The Children's Oncology Group conducted the largest case-control study of childhood GCT to investigate whether parental exposures to smoking and alcohol contributed to the disease.

METHODS

Cases included 274 children with GCT diagnosed between January 1, 1993 and December 31, 2001 who were age <15 years. Controls (n=421) were selected by random digit dialing and were frequency matched based on gender, age (+/-1 year), and geographic area. Exposure information was collected from subjects' parents using independent telephone interviews and self-administrated questionnaires.

RESULTS

No association was found between parental smoking or drinking alcohol and risk of childhood GCT (for smoking: odds ratio [OR]=1.0, 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.8-1.3 and OR = 1.2, 95% CI, 0.9-1.5, for mothers and fathers, respectively; for drinking: OR=0.9, 95% CI, 0.7-1.2 and OR=1.0, 95% CI, 0.8-1.3, for mothers and fathers, respectively). No significant trend was observed for length of maternal exposure to passive smoking during the index pregnancy and GCT risk (for total subject: P=0.77; boys: P=0.52; girls: P=0.93).

CONCLUSIONS

The authors found no evidence that childhood GCT was related to prenatal exposure to parental cigarette smoking, alcohol drinking, and maternal passive smoking.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Ingram-Cancer Center and Center for Health Services Research, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-8300, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15685619

Citation

Chen, Zhi, et al. "Risk of Childhood Germ Cell Tumors in Association With Parental Smoking and Drinking." Cancer, vol. 103, no. 5, 2005, pp. 1064-71.
Chen Z, Robison L, Giller R, et al. Risk of childhood germ cell tumors in association with parental smoking and drinking. Cancer. 2005;103(5):1064-71.
Chen, Z., Robison, L., Giller, R., Krailo, M., Davis, M., Gardner, K., Davies, S., & Shu, X. O. (2005). Risk of childhood germ cell tumors in association with parental smoking and drinking. Cancer, 103(5), 1064-71.
Chen Z, et al. Risk of Childhood Germ Cell Tumors in Association With Parental Smoking and Drinking. Cancer. 2005 Mar 1;103(5):1064-71. PubMed PMID: 15685619.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Risk of childhood germ cell tumors in association with parental smoking and drinking. AU - Chen,Zhi, AU - Robison,Leslie, AU - Giller,Roger, AU - Krailo,Mark, AU - Davis,Mary, AU - Gardner,Kathleen, AU - Davies,Stella, AU - Shu,Xiao-Ou, PY - 2005/2/3/pubmed PY - 2005/3/30/medline PY - 2005/2/3/entrez SP - 1064 EP - 71 JF - Cancer JO - Cancer VL - 103 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: The etiology of childhood germ cell tumors (GCT) is not well understood. The Children's Oncology Group conducted the largest case-control study of childhood GCT to investigate whether parental exposures to smoking and alcohol contributed to the disease. METHODS: Cases included 274 children with GCT diagnosed between January 1, 1993 and December 31, 2001 who were age <15 years. Controls (n=421) were selected by random digit dialing and were frequency matched based on gender, age (+/-1 year), and geographic area. Exposure information was collected from subjects' parents using independent telephone interviews and self-administrated questionnaires. RESULTS: No association was found between parental smoking or drinking alcohol and risk of childhood GCT (for smoking: odds ratio [OR]=1.0, 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.8-1.3 and OR = 1.2, 95% CI, 0.9-1.5, for mothers and fathers, respectively; for drinking: OR=0.9, 95% CI, 0.7-1.2 and OR=1.0, 95% CI, 0.8-1.3, for mothers and fathers, respectively). No significant trend was observed for length of maternal exposure to passive smoking during the index pregnancy and GCT risk (for total subject: P=0.77; boys: P=0.52; girls: P=0.93). CONCLUSIONS: The authors found no evidence that childhood GCT was related to prenatal exposure to parental cigarette smoking, alcohol drinking, and maternal passive smoking. SN - 0008-543X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15685619/Risk_of_childhood_germ_cell_tumors_in_association_with_parental_smoking_and_drinking_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.20894 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -