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Race, education, and knowledge of bone marrow registry: indicators of willingness to donate bone marrow among African Americans and Caucasians.
Transplant Proc. 2004 Dec; 36(10):3212-9.TP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

As bone marrow transplantation (BMT) increases, the availability of suitable donors becomes critical, especially for African Americans, who require a large donor pool to find a suitable match. Previous studies indicated willingness to donate marrow may be a barrier for achieving a large donor pool.

METHODS

We conducted a random-sample, statewide telephone survey of 421 Caucasians and 408 African Americans in South Carolina to determine if racial differences in willingness to donate bone marrow exist. We assessed a general level of willingness, asking, "Will you be willing to be a marrow donor?" We assessed an additional level of willingness, asking, "Are you willing to be contacted about bone marrow donation?"

RESULTS

We detected no racial differences in general willingness to donate (Caucasians 34%, African Americans 32%, P=.52), although there was a difference in willingness to be contacted to sign-up for the registry (Caucasians 18.3%, African Americans 11%, P=.003). African Americans were more aware that better matches occur within the same race (P <.0001). Caucasians were more knowledgeable about the registry (P <.0001). Younger, more highly educated respondents indicated a greater willingness to be donors. In both races, fear of pain was the most common reason for unwillingness to donate, and it was significantly higher in African Americans.

CONCLUSION

Our study suggests reported lack of general willingness does not explain the racial disparities in BMT. Many who expressed willingness to donate were not willing to be contacted to sign up for the registry, especially African Americans. Education and adequate pain control may improve minority recruitment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina 29414, USA. onitiloadedayo@marshfieldclinic.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15686731

Citation

Onitilo, A A., et al. "Race, Education, and Knowledge of Bone Marrow Registry: Indicators of Willingness to Donate Bone Marrow Among African Americans and Caucasians." Transplantation Proceedings, vol. 36, no. 10, 2004, pp. 3212-9.
Onitilo AA, Lin YH, Okonofua EC, et al. Race, education, and knowledge of bone marrow registry: indicators of willingness to donate bone marrow among African Americans and Caucasians. Transplant Proc. 2004;36(10):3212-9.
Onitilo, A. A., Lin, Y. H., Okonofua, E. C., Afrin, L. B., Ariail, J., & Tilley, B. C. (2004). Race, education, and knowledge of bone marrow registry: indicators of willingness to donate bone marrow among African Americans and Caucasians. Transplantation Proceedings, 36(10), 3212-9.
Onitilo AA, et al. Race, Education, and Knowledge of Bone Marrow Registry: Indicators of Willingness to Donate Bone Marrow Among African Americans and Caucasians. Transplant Proc. 2004;36(10):3212-9. PubMed PMID: 15686731.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Race, education, and knowledge of bone marrow registry: indicators of willingness to donate bone marrow among African Americans and Caucasians. AU - Onitilo,A A, AU - Lin,Y H, AU - Okonofua,E C, AU - Afrin,L B, AU - Ariail,J, AU - Tilley,B C, PY - 2005/2/3/pubmed PY - 2005/7/8/medline PY - 2005/2/3/entrez SP - 3212 EP - 9 JF - Transplantation proceedings JO - Transplant Proc VL - 36 IS - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND: As bone marrow transplantation (BMT) increases, the availability of suitable donors becomes critical, especially for African Americans, who require a large donor pool to find a suitable match. Previous studies indicated willingness to donate marrow may be a barrier for achieving a large donor pool. METHODS: We conducted a random-sample, statewide telephone survey of 421 Caucasians and 408 African Americans in South Carolina to determine if racial differences in willingness to donate bone marrow exist. We assessed a general level of willingness, asking, "Will you be willing to be a marrow donor?" We assessed an additional level of willingness, asking, "Are you willing to be contacted about bone marrow donation?" RESULTS: We detected no racial differences in general willingness to donate (Caucasians 34%, African Americans 32%, P=.52), although there was a difference in willingness to be contacted to sign-up for the registry (Caucasians 18.3%, African Americans 11%, P=.003). African Americans were more aware that better matches occur within the same race (P <.0001). Caucasians were more knowledgeable about the registry (P <.0001). Younger, more highly educated respondents indicated a greater willingness to be donors. In both races, fear of pain was the most common reason for unwillingness to donate, and it was significantly higher in African Americans. CONCLUSION: Our study suggests reported lack of general willingness does not explain the racial disparities in BMT. Many who expressed willingness to donate were not willing to be contacted to sign up for the registry, especially African Americans. Education and adequate pain control may improve minority recruitment. SN - 0041-1345 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15686731/Race_education_and_knowledge_of_bone_marrow_registry:_indicators_of_willingness_to_donate_bone_marrow_among_African_Americans_and_Caucasians_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0041-1345(04)01185-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -