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Body mass index and risk of malignant lymphoma in Scandinavian men and women.
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2005 Feb 02; 97(3):210-8.JNCI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The incidence of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and prevalence of obesity are increasing globally. A suggested positive association between obesity and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma has prompted us to investigate the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and risk of malignant lymphoma subtypes in a population-based case-control study.

METHODS

Telephone interviews were conducted with 3055 case patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma and 618 case patients with Hodgkin lymphoma diagnosed between October 1, 1999, and August 30, 2002, and 3187 population-based control subjects. The interviews assessed current height, normal adult weight, and other possible risk factors. Multivariable odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for risk of lymphoma were estimated by unconditional logistic regression. All statistical tests were two-sided.

RESULTS

BMI was not associated with risk of overall non-Hodgkin lymphoma or of Hodgkin lymphoma (for example, comparing the highly obese group [BMI > or =35.0 kg/m2] with the normal-weight group [BMI = 18.5-24.9 kg/m2], OR for risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma = 0.9, 95% CI = 0.6 to 1.3; P(trend) across all categories of BMI = .27). BMI was also not associated with risk of any non-Hodgkin lymphoma subtype evaluated, although there was some evidence of a positive association with risk of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (for example, comparing the highly obese group with the normal-weight group, OR for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma = 1.5, 95% CI = 0.9 to 2.4; P(trend) =.05).

CONCLUSIONS

Excess weight does not appear to be associated with an increased risk of malignant lymphoma in general, or with a risk of most major lymphoma subtypes. Hence, the growing incidence of obesity is unlikely to be an important contributor to the increasing incidence of non-Hodgkin lymphoma worldwide.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Box 281, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden. ellen.chang@meb.ki.seNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15687364

Citation

Chang, Ellen T., et al. "Body Mass Index and Risk of Malignant Lymphoma in Scandinavian Men and Women." Journal of the National Cancer Institute, vol. 97, no. 3, 2005, pp. 210-8.
Chang ET, Hjalgrim H, Smedby KE, et al. Body mass index and risk of malignant lymphoma in Scandinavian men and women. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2005;97(3):210-8.
Chang, E. T., Hjalgrim, H., Smedby, K. E., Akerman, M., Tani, E., Johnsen, H. E., Glimelius, B., Adami, H. O., & Melbye, M. (2005). Body mass index and risk of malignant lymphoma in Scandinavian men and women. Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 97(3), 210-8.
Chang ET, et al. Body Mass Index and Risk of Malignant Lymphoma in Scandinavian Men and Women. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2005 Feb 2;97(3):210-8. PubMed PMID: 15687364.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Body mass index and risk of malignant lymphoma in Scandinavian men and women. AU - Chang,Ellen T, AU - Hjalgrim,Henrik, AU - Smedby,Karin Ekström, AU - Akerman,Måns, AU - Tani,Edneia, AU - Johnsen,Hans E, AU - Glimelius,Bengt, AU - Adami,Hans-Olov, AU - Melbye,Mads, PY - 2005/2/3/pubmed PY - 2005/2/16/medline PY - 2005/2/3/entrez SP - 210 EP - 8 JF - Journal of the National Cancer Institute JO - J. Natl. Cancer Inst. VL - 97 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: The incidence of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and prevalence of obesity are increasing globally. A suggested positive association between obesity and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma has prompted us to investigate the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and risk of malignant lymphoma subtypes in a population-based case-control study. METHODS: Telephone interviews were conducted with 3055 case patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma and 618 case patients with Hodgkin lymphoma diagnosed between October 1, 1999, and August 30, 2002, and 3187 population-based control subjects. The interviews assessed current height, normal adult weight, and other possible risk factors. Multivariable odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for risk of lymphoma were estimated by unconditional logistic regression. All statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS: BMI was not associated with risk of overall non-Hodgkin lymphoma or of Hodgkin lymphoma (for example, comparing the highly obese group [BMI > or =35.0 kg/m2] with the normal-weight group [BMI = 18.5-24.9 kg/m2], OR for risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma = 0.9, 95% CI = 0.6 to 1.3; P(trend) across all categories of BMI = .27). BMI was also not associated with risk of any non-Hodgkin lymphoma subtype evaluated, although there was some evidence of a positive association with risk of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (for example, comparing the highly obese group with the normal-weight group, OR for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma = 1.5, 95% CI = 0.9 to 2.4; P(trend) =.05). CONCLUSIONS: Excess weight does not appear to be associated with an increased risk of malignant lymphoma in general, or with a risk of most major lymphoma subtypes. Hence, the growing incidence of obesity is unlikely to be an important contributor to the increasing incidence of non-Hodgkin lymphoma worldwide. SN - 1460-2105 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15687364/Body_mass_index_and_risk_of_malignant_lymphoma_in_Scandinavian_men_and_women_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jnci/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jnci/dji012 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -