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Racial and ethnic disparities in early childhood health and health care.
Pediatrics 2005; 115(2):e183-93Ped

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Racial/ethnic disparities in health care have received much national attention recently, but few studies have focused on disparities among children. We studied disparities in early childhood health and health care.

METHODS

We analyzed data for 2608 children, 4 to 35 months of age, from the 2000 National Survey of Early Childhood Health, a nationwide household survey. The overall response rate was 65.6%. Survey questions addressed health, health care, and interactions with health care providers.

RESULTS

Hispanic and black children were significantly less likely than whites to be in excellent/very good health (72%, 79%, and 90%, respectively) and were more likely to be uninsured (31%, 18%, and 9%, respectively). Only 60% of Hispanic and 77% of black parents would recommend their child's provider to others, compared with 84% of white parents. Minority parents more often reported that providers never or only sometimes understood their child-rearing preferences, and Hispanic parents most often reported that providers never or only sometimes understood their child's needs. Minority parents more often were asked about violence, smoking, drinking, and drug use. Hispanic and black parents averaged significantly fewer telephone calls to doctors' offices than did whites (2.0, 3.1, and 4.3 calls, respectively). Providers significantly less often referred Hispanic and black children to specialists (11% and 17%, respectively, compared with 22% for whites). Most disparities persisted in multivariate analyses, and several disparities were found between children with parents who completed surveys in Spanish and those with parents who completed surveys in English.

CONCLUSION

Young minority children experience multiple disparities in health status, insurance coverage, topics discussed during pediatric visits, parents feeling understood by providers, parental satisfaction, and referrals to specialists.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for the Advancement of Underserved Children, Department of Pediatrics, Medical College of Wisconsin, 8701 Watertown Plank Rd, Milwaukee, WI 53226, USA. gflores@mail.mcw.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15687426

Citation

Flores, Glenn, et al. "Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Early Childhood Health and Health Care." Pediatrics, vol. 115, no. 2, 2005, pp. e183-93.
Flores G, Olson L, Tomany-Korman SC. Racial and ethnic disparities in early childhood health and health care. Pediatrics. 2005;115(2):e183-93.
Flores, G., Olson, L., & Tomany-Korman, S. C. (2005). Racial and ethnic disparities in early childhood health and health care. Pediatrics, 115(2), pp. e183-93.
Flores G, Olson L, Tomany-Korman SC. Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Early Childhood Health and Health Care. Pediatrics. 2005;115(2):e183-93. PubMed PMID: 15687426.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Racial and ethnic disparities in early childhood health and health care. AU - Flores,Glenn, AU - Olson,Lynn, AU - Tomany-Korman,Sandra C, PY - 2005/2/3/pubmed PY - 2005/5/6/medline PY - 2005/2/3/entrez SP - e183 EP - 93 JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 115 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Racial/ethnic disparities in health care have received much national attention recently, but few studies have focused on disparities among children. We studied disparities in early childhood health and health care. METHODS: We analyzed data for 2608 children, 4 to 35 months of age, from the 2000 National Survey of Early Childhood Health, a nationwide household survey. The overall response rate was 65.6%. Survey questions addressed health, health care, and interactions with health care providers. RESULTS: Hispanic and black children were significantly less likely than whites to be in excellent/very good health (72%, 79%, and 90%, respectively) and were more likely to be uninsured (31%, 18%, and 9%, respectively). Only 60% of Hispanic and 77% of black parents would recommend their child's provider to others, compared with 84% of white parents. Minority parents more often reported that providers never or only sometimes understood their child-rearing preferences, and Hispanic parents most often reported that providers never or only sometimes understood their child's needs. Minority parents more often were asked about violence, smoking, drinking, and drug use. Hispanic and black parents averaged significantly fewer telephone calls to doctors' offices than did whites (2.0, 3.1, and 4.3 calls, respectively). Providers significantly less often referred Hispanic and black children to specialists (11% and 17%, respectively, compared with 22% for whites). Most disparities persisted in multivariate analyses, and several disparities were found between children with parents who completed surveys in Spanish and those with parents who completed surveys in English. CONCLUSION: Young minority children experience multiple disparities in health status, insurance coverage, topics discussed during pediatric visits, parents feeling understood by providers, parental satisfaction, and referrals to specialists. SN - 1098-4275 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15687426/Racial_and_ethnic_disparities_in_early_childhood_health_and_health_care_ L2 - http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=15687426 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -