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GB virus C coinfection and HIV-1 disease progression: The Amsterdam Cohort Study.
J Infect Dis. 2005 Mar 01; 191(5):678-85.JI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The effect that GB virus C (GBV-C) coinfection has on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) disease progression is controversial and therefore was studied in 326 homosexual men from the prospective Amsterdam Cohort Studies who had an accurately estimated date of HIV-1 seroconversion and were followed up for a median period of 8 years.

METHODS

A first plasma sample, obtained shortly after HIV-1 seroconversion, and a last plasma sample, obtained before 1996, were tested for GBV-C RNA and envelope protein-2 antibodies. The effect that GBV-C has on HIV-1 disease progression was studied by use of time-dependent Cox proportional-hazards models with adjustment for baseline variables and time-updated HIV-1 RNA and CD4(+) cell count.

RESULTS

Men who lost GBV-C RNA between collection of the first sample and collection of the last sample had a nearly 3-fold-higher risk of HIV-1 disease progression than did men who had never had GBV-C RNA. This effect became much smaller after adjustment for time-updated CD4(+) cell count.

CONCLUSION

Rather than a positive effect of GBV-C RNA presence, a negative effect of GBV-C RNA loss on HIV-1 disease progression was found, which disappeared after adjustment for time-updated CD4(+) cell count. We therefore hypothesize that GBV-C RNA persistence depends on the presence of a sufficient number of CD4(+) cells--and that the CD4(+) cell decrease associated with HIV-1 disease progression is a cause, not a consequence, of GBV-C RNA loss.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of HIV and STD Research, Cluster of Infectious Diseases, Municipal Health Service of Amsterdam, The Netherlands.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15688280

Citation

Van der Bij, Akke K., et al. "GB Virus C Coinfection and HIV-1 Disease Progression: the Amsterdam Cohort Study." The Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 191, no. 5, 2005, pp. 678-85.
Van der Bij AK, Kloosterboer N, Prins M, et al. GB virus C coinfection and HIV-1 disease progression: The Amsterdam Cohort Study. J Infect Dis. 2005;191(5):678-85.
Van der Bij, A. K., Kloosterboer, N., Prins, M., Boeser-Nunnink, B., Geskus, R. B., Lange, J. M., Coutinho, R. A., & Schuitemaker, H. (2005). GB virus C coinfection and HIV-1 disease progression: The Amsterdam Cohort Study. The Journal of Infectious Diseases, 191(5), 678-85.
Van der Bij AK, et al. GB Virus C Coinfection and HIV-1 Disease Progression: the Amsterdam Cohort Study. J Infect Dis. 2005 Mar 1;191(5):678-85. PubMed PMID: 15688280.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - GB virus C coinfection and HIV-1 disease progression: The Amsterdam Cohort Study. AU - Van der Bij,Akke K, AU - Kloosterboer,Nico, AU - Prins,Maria, AU - Boeser-Nunnink,Brigitte, AU - Geskus,Ronald B, AU - Lange,Joep M A, AU - Coutinho,Roel A, AU - Schuitemaker,Hanneke, Y1 - 2005/01/28/ PY - 2004/05/18/received PY - 2004/09/14/accepted PY - 2005/2/3/pubmed PY - 2005/3/25/medline PY - 2005/2/3/entrez SP - 678 EP - 85 JF - The Journal of infectious diseases JO - J Infect Dis VL - 191 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: The effect that GB virus C (GBV-C) coinfection has on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) disease progression is controversial and therefore was studied in 326 homosexual men from the prospective Amsterdam Cohort Studies who had an accurately estimated date of HIV-1 seroconversion and were followed up for a median period of 8 years. METHODS: A first plasma sample, obtained shortly after HIV-1 seroconversion, and a last plasma sample, obtained before 1996, were tested for GBV-C RNA and envelope protein-2 antibodies. The effect that GBV-C has on HIV-1 disease progression was studied by use of time-dependent Cox proportional-hazards models with adjustment for baseline variables and time-updated HIV-1 RNA and CD4(+) cell count. RESULTS: Men who lost GBV-C RNA between collection of the first sample and collection of the last sample had a nearly 3-fold-higher risk of HIV-1 disease progression than did men who had never had GBV-C RNA. This effect became much smaller after adjustment for time-updated CD4(+) cell count. CONCLUSION: Rather than a positive effect of GBV-C RNA presence, a negative effect of GBV-C RNA loss on HIV-1 disease progression was found, which disappeared after adjustment for time-updated CD4(+) cell count. We therefore hypothesize that GBV-C RNA persistence depends on the presence of a sufficient number of CD4(+) cells--and that the CD4(+) cell decrease associated with HIV-1 disease progression is a cause, not a consequence, of GBV-C RNA loss. SN - 0022-1899 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15688280/GB_virus_C_coinfection_and_HIV_1_disease_progression:_The_Amsterdam_Cohort_Study_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jid/article-lookup/doi/10.1086/427559 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -