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High school dietary dairy intake and teenage acne.
J Am Acad Dermatol 2005; 52(2):207-14JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Previous studies suggest possible associations between Western diet and acne. We examined data from the Nurses Health Study II to retrospectively evaluate whether intakes of dairy foods during high school were associated with physician-diagnosed severe teenage acne.

METHODS

We studied 47,355 women who completed questionnaires on high school diet in 1998 and physician-diagnosed severe teenage acne in 1989. We estimated the prevalence ratios and 95% confidence intervals of acne history across categories of intakes.

RESULTS

After accounting for age, age at menarche, body mass index, and energy intake, the multivariate prevalence ratio (95% confidence intervals; P value for test of trend) of acne, comparing extreme categories of intake, were: 1.22 (1.03, 1.44; .002) for total milk; 1.12 (1.00, 1.25; .56) for whole milk; 1.16 (1.01, 1.34; .25) for low-fat milk; and 1.44 (1.21, 1.72; .003) for skim milk. Instant breakfast drink, sherbet, cottage cheese, and cream cheese were also positively associated with acne.

CONCLUSION

We found a positive association with acne for intake of total milk and skim milk. We hypothesize that the association with milk may be because of the presence of hormones and bioactive molecules in milk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. clement.adebamowo@channing.harvard.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15692464

Citation

Adebamowo, Clement A., et al. "High School Dietary Dairy Intake and Teenage Acne." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, vol. 52, no. 2, 2005, pp. 207-14.
Adebamowo CA, Spiegelman D, Danby FW, et al. High school dietary dairy intake and teenage acne. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2005;52(2):207-14.
Adebamowo, C. A., Spiegelman, D., Danby, F. W., Frazier, A. L., Willett, W. C., & Holmes, M. D. (2005). High school dietary dairy intake and teenage acne. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, 52(2), pp. 207-14.
Adebamowo CA, et al. High School Dietary Dairy Intake and Teenage Acne. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2005;52(2):207-14. PubMed PMID: 15692464.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - High school dietary dairy intake and teenage acne. AU - Adebamowo,Clement A, AU - Spiegelman,Donna, AU - Danby,F William, AU - Frazier,A Lindsay, AU - Willett,Walter C, AU - Holmes,Michelle D, PY - 2005/2/5/pubmed PY - 2005/9/17/medline PY - 2005/2/5/entrez SP - 207 EP - 14 JF - Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology JO - J. Am. Acad. Dermatol. VL - 52 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Previous studies suggest possible associations between Western diet and acne. We examined data from the Nurses Health Study II to retrospectively evaluate whether intakes of dairy foods during high school were associated with physician-diagnosed severe teenage acne. METHODS: We studied 47,355 women who completed questionnaires on high school diet in 1998 and physician-diagnosed severe teenage acne in 1989. We estimated the prevalence ratios and 95% confidence intervals of acne history across categories of intakes. RESULTS: After accounting for age, age at menarche, body mass index, and energy intake, the multivariate prevalence ratio (95% confidence intervals; P value for test of trend) of acne, comparing extreme categories of intake, were: 1.22 (1.03, 1.44; .002) for total milk; 1.12 (1.00, 1.25; .56) for whole milk; 1.16 (1.01, 1.34; .25) for low-fat milk; and 1.44 (1.21, 1.72; .003) for skim milk. Instant breakfast drink, sherbet, cottage cheese, and cream cheese were also positively associated with acne. CONCLUSION: We found a positive association with acne for intake of total milk and skim milk. We hypothesize that the association with milk may be because of the presence of hormones and bioactive molecules in milk. SN - 1097-6787 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15692464/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0190962204021589 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -