Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

No associations between Parkinson's disease and polymorphisms of the quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1, NQO2) genes.
Neurosci Lett. 2005 Mar 03; 375(3):178-80.NL

Abstract

Reactive oxygen species derived from dopamine metabolism can induce oxidative stress and thus may contribute to Parkinson's disease (PD) pathogenesis. The quinone oxidoreductases, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) (NAD[P]H): quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) and dihydronicotinamide riboside (NRH): quinone oxidoreductase 2 (NQO2) detoxify quinones and quinonoid compounds. We investigated associations of genetic polymorphisms of NQO1 (C609T) and NQO2 (I/D, 29 base pairs) with PD in a population-based case-control study of 190 idiopathic PD cases and 305 unrelated controls matched on age and sex. No associations were detected for either gene variant or for any allele combinations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, Box 357234, Seattle, WA 98195-7234, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15694256

Citation

Okada, Starlyn, et al. "No Associations Between Parkinson's Disease and Polymorphisms of the Quinone Oxidoreductase (NQO1, NQO2) Genes." Neuroscience Letters, vol. 375, no. 3, 2005, pp. 178-80.
Okada S, Farin FM, Stapleton P, et al. No associations between Parkinson's disease and polymorphisms of the quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1, NQO2) genes. Neurosci Lett. 2005;375(3):178-80.
Okada, S., Farin, F. M., Stapleton, P., Viernes, H., Quigley, S. D., Powers, K. M., Smith-Weller, T., Franklin, G. M., Longstreth, W. T., Swanson, P. D., & Checkoway, H. (2005). No associations between Parkinson's disease and polymorphisms of the quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1, NQO2) genes. Neuroscience Letters, 375(3), 178-80.
Okada S, et al. No Associations Between Parkinson's Disease and Polymorphisms of the Quinone Oxidoreductase (NQO1, NQO2) Genes. Neurosci Lett. 2005 Mar 3;375(3):178-80. PubMed PMID: 15694256.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - No associations between Parkinson's disease and polymorphisms of the quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1, NQO2) genes. AU - Okada,Starlyn, AU - Farin,Federico M, AU - Stapleton,Patricia, AU - Viernes,Hanna, AU - Quigley,Sean D, AU - Powers,Karen M, AU - Smith-Weller,Terri, AU - Franklin,Gary M, AU - Longstreth,W T, AU - Swanson,Phillip D, AU - Checkoway,Harvey, Y1 - 2004/12/10/ PY - 2004/10/04/received PY - 2004/11/02/revised PY - 2004/11/03/accepted PY - 2005/2/8/pubmed PY - 2005/5/17/medline PY - 2005/2/8/entrez SP - 178 EP - 80 JF - Neuroscience letters JO - Neurosci Lett VL - 375 IS - 3 N2 - Reactive oxygen species derived from dopamine metabolism can induce oxidative stress and thus may contribute to Parkinson's disease (PD) pathogenesis. The quinone oxidoreductases, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) (NAD[P]H): quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) and dihydronicotinamide riboside (NRH): quinone oxidoreductase 2 (NQO2) detoxify quinones and quinonoid compounds. We investigated associations of genetic polymorphisms of NQO1 (C609T) and NQO2 (I/D, 29 base pairs) with PD in a population-based case-control study of 190 idiopathic PD cases and 305 unrelated controls matched on age and sex. No associations were detected for either gene variant or for any allele combinations. SN - 0304-3940 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15694256/No_associations_between_Parkinson's_disease_and_polymorphisms_of_the_quinone_oxidoreductase__NQO1_NQO2__genes_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0304-3940(04)01404-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -