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Relation of the tocopherol forms to incident Alzheimer disease and to cognitive change.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

High intake of vitamin E from food (tocopherol), but not from supplements (which usually contain alpha-tocopherol), is inversely associated with Alzheimer disease.

OBJECTIVE

We examined whether food intakes of vitamin E, alpha-tocopherol equivalents (a measure of the relative biologic activity of tocopherols and tocotrienols), or individual tocopherols would protect against incident Alzheimer disease and cognitive decline over 6 y in participants of the Chicago Health and Aging Project.

DESIGN

The 1993-2002 study of community residents aged >or=65 y included the administration of 4 cognitive tests and clinical evaluations for Alzheimer disease. Dietary assessment was by food-frequency questionnaire.

RESULTS

Tocopherol intake from food was related to the 4-y incidence of Alzheimer disease determined by logistic regression in 1041 participants who were clinically evaluated (n=162 incident cases) and to change in a global cognitive score determined by mixed models in 3718 participants. Higher intakes of vitamin E (relative risk: 0.74 per 5 mg/d increase; 95% CI: 0.62, 0.88) and alpha-tocopherol equivalents (relative risk: 0.56 per 5 mg/d increase; 95% CI: 0.32, 0.98) were associated with a reduced incidence of Alzheimer disease in separate multiple-adjusted models that included intakes of saturated and trans fats and docosahexaenoic acid. alpha- and gamma-Tocopherol had independent associations. In separate mixed models, a slower rate of cognitive decline was associated with intakes of vitamin E, alpha-tocopherol equivalents, and alpha- and gamma-tocopherols.

CONCLUSION

The results suggest that various tocopherol forms rather than alpha- tocopherol alone may be important in the vitamin E protective association with Alzheimer disease.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Rush Institute for Healthy Aging, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL 60612, USA. martha_c_morris@rush.edu

    , , , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Aged
    Alzheimer Disease
    Antioxidants
    Cognition
    Confidence Intervals
    Diet
    Dietary Supplements
    Female
    Humans
    Incidence
    Logistic Models
    Longitudinal Studies
    Male
    Nutrition Assessment
    Risk
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    Tocopherols
    Vitamin E
    alpha-Tocopherol
    gamma-Tocopherol

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    15699242

    Citation

    Morris, Martha Clare, et al. "Relation of the Tocopherol Forms to Incident Alzheimer Disease and to Cognitive Change." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 81, no. 2, 2005, pp. 508-14.
    Morris MC, Evans DA, Tangney CC, et al. Relation of the tocopherol forms to incident Alzheimer disease and to cognitive change. Am J Clin Nutr. 2005;81(2):508-14.
    Morris, M. C., Evans, D. A., Tangney, C. C., Bienias, J. L., Wilson, R. S., Aggarwal, N. T., & Scherr, P. A. (2005). Relation of the tocopherol forms to incident Alzheimer disease and to cognitive change. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 81(2), pp. 508-14.
    Morris MC, et al. Relation of the Tocopherol Forms to Incident Alzheimer Disease and to Cognitive Change. Am J Clin Nutr. 2005;81(2):508-14. PubMed PMID: 15699242.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Relation of the tocopherol forms to incident Alzheimer disease and to cognitive change. AU - Morris,Martha Clare, AU - Evans,Denis A, AU - Tangney,Christine C, AU - Bienias,Julia L, AU - Wilson,Robert S, AU - Aggarwal,Neelum T, AU - Scherr,Paul A, PY - 2005/2/9/pubmed PY - 2005/3/9/medline PY - 2005/2/9/entrez SP - 508 EP - 14 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 81 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: High intake of vitamin E from food (tocopherol), but not from supplements (which usually contain alpha-tocopherol), is inversely associated with Alzheimer disease. OBJECTIVE: We examined whether food intakes of vitamin E, alpha-tocopherol equivalents (a measure of the relative biologic activity of tocopherols and tocotrienols), or individual tocopherols would protect against incident Alzheimer disease and cognitive decline over 6 y in participants of the Chicago Health and Aging Project. DESIGN: The 1993-2002 study of community residents aged >or=65 y included the administration of 4 cognitive tests and clinical evaluations for Alzheimer disease. Dietary assessment was by food-frequency questionnaire. RESULTS: Tocopherol intake from food was related to the 4-y incidence of Alzheimer disease determined by logistic regression in 1041 participants who were clinically evaluated (n=162 incident cases) and to change in a global cognitive score determined by mixed models in 3718 participants. Higher intakes of vitamin E (relative risk: 0.74 per 5 mg/d increase; 95% CI: 0.62, 0.88) and alpha-tocopherol equivalents (relative risk: 0.56 per 5 mg/d increase; 95% CI: 0.32, 0.98) were associated with a reduced incidence of Alzheimer disease in separate multiple-adjusted models that included intakes of saturated and trans fats and docosahexaenoic acid. alpha- and gamma-Tocopherol had independent associations. In separate mixed models, a slower rate of cognitive decline was associated with intakes of vitamin E, alpha-tocopherol equivalents, and alpha- and gamma-tocopherols. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that various tocopherol forms rather than alpha- tocopherol alone may be important in the vitamin E protective association with Alzheimer disease. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15699242/Relation_of_the_tocopherol_forms_to_incident_Alzheimer_disease_and_to_cognitive_change_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn.81.2.508 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -