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Atherosclerosis and AD: analysis of data from the US National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center.
Neurology 2005; 64(3):494-500Neur

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Epidemiologic studies have implicated cerebrovascular disease and its antecedents as risk factors for Alzheimer disease (AD). Cerebral atherosclerosis or strokes may increase the deposition of neuritic plaques or the formation of neurofibrillary tangles. Alternatively, they may simply hasten the age at onset of disease, or increase the severity of disease symptoms. This investigation examined the association between cerebrovascular disease and the pathologic manifestations of AD in an autopsy series.

METHODS

This was a cross-sectional study using data from the United States National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center database. The primary analysis included 1,054 individuals with clinical information and semiquantitative neuropathologic measurements: 921 had AD as the primary neuropathologic diagnosis and 133 were considered neuropathologically normal.

RESULTS

Overall, 9% of the individuals had clinical history of stroke during life, but 33% had evidence of cerebral infarcts at postmortem. There was no association between neuritic plaques or neurofibrillary tangles, the primary neuropathologic manifestations of AD, with either clinical history of stroke or the presence of cerebral infarcts at postmortem. The authors did find a higher frequency of neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles with increased amyloid angiopathy. Neither plaques nor tangles were associated with small vessel cerebrovascular disease, arteriosclerosis. However, the presence of large-vessel cerebrovascular disease, or atherosclerosis, was strongly associated with an increased frequency of neuritic plaques.

CONCLUSIONS

Atherosclerotic cerebrovascular disease may have a role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease, because of a strong association with frequent neuritic plaques.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimer's Disease and the Aging Brain, the Gertrude H. Sergievsky Center, and the Department of Neurology, Columbia University College of Physicians & Surgeons, New York, NY 10032, USA. lh456@columbia.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15699381

Citation

Honig, Lawrence S., et al. "Atherosclerosis and AD: Analysis of Data From the US National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center." Neurology, vol. 64, no. 3, 2005, pp. 494-500.
Honig LS, Kukull W, Mayeux R. Atherosclerosis and AD: analysis of data from the US National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center. Neurology. 2005;64(3):494-500.
Honig, L. S., Kukull, W., & Mayeux, R. (2005). Atherosclerosis and AD: analysis of data from the US National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center. Neurology, 64(3), pp. 494-500.
Honig LS, Kukull W, Mayeux R. Atherosclerosis and AD: Analysis of Data From the US National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center. Neurology. 2005 Feb 8;64(3):494-500. PubMed PMID: 15699381.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Atherosclerosis and AD: analysis of data from the US National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center. AU - Honig,Lawrence S, AU - Kukull,Walter, AU - Mayeux,Richard, PY - 2005/2/9/pubmed PY - 2005/9/20/medline PY - 2005/2/9/entrez SP - 494 EP - 500 JF - Neurology JO - Neurology VL - 64 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Epidemiologic studies have implicated cerebrovascular disease and its antecedents as risk factors for Alzheimer disease (AD). Cerebral atherosclerosis or strokes may increase the deposition of neuritic plaques or the formation of neurofibrillary tangles. Alternatively, they may simply hasten the age at onset of disease, or increase the severity of disease symptoms. This investigation examined the association between cerebrovascular disease and the pathologic manifestations of AD in an autopsy series. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study using data from the United States National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center database. The primary analysis included 1,054 individuals with clinical information and semiquantitative neuropathologic measurements: 921 had AD as the primary neuropathologic diagnosis and 133 were considered neuropathologically normal. RESULTS: Overall, 9% of the individuals had clinical history of stroke during life, but 33% had evidence of cerebral infarcts at postmortem. There was no association between neuritic plaques or neurofibrillary tangles, the primary neuropathologic manifestations of AD, with either clinical history of stroke or the presence of cerebral infarcts at postmortem. The authors did find a higher frequency of neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles with increased amyloid angiopathy. Neither plaques nor tangles were associated with small vessel cerebrovascular disease, arteriosclerosis. However, the presence of large-vessel cerebrovascular disease, or atherosclerosis, was strongly associated with an increased frequency of neuritic plaques. CONCLUSIONS: Atherosclerotic cerebrovascular disease may have a role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease, because of a strong association with frequent neuritic plaques. SN - 1526-632X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15699381/Atherosclerosis_and_AD:_analysis_of_data_from_the_US_National_Alzheimer's_Coordinating_Center_ L2 - http://www.neurology.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=15699381 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -