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Update in traveler's diarrhea.
Infect Dis Clin North Am. 2005 Mar; 19(1):137-49.ID

Abstract

TD has not proved as preventable as hoped, despite knowing that it is transmitted mainly through food. Travelers have little ability to select restaurants based on the kitchen hygiene. The rates of TD in travelers to developing countries have not changed in the past 50 years, either because the dietary precautions they are taught are not effective or they cannot be adhered to in the course of a pleasurable vacation. Nonantibiotic prophylaxis with bismuth subsalicylate has the potential to prevent 40% to 60% of TD episodes in short-term travelers, and is probably underused. Antibiotic prophylaxis can prevent up to 90% of infections, but is not routinely recommended. Empiric treatment of TD has been the best approach to dealing with this problem, but its usefulness is being undermined by growing antibiotic resistance in many parts of the world. Fluoroquinolones are still the most useful agents where Campylobacter is not a predominant pathogen. Rifaximin may prove to be a useful addition to the options for treatment and prophylaxis. If used for treatment, it may require a backup antibiotic in areas where Campylobacter and Shigella are prominent pathogens.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Jackson Hole Travel and Tropical Medicine, PO Box 40, Kelly, WY 83011, USA. drshlim@wyom.net

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15701551

Citation

Shlim, David R.. "Update in Traveler's Diarrhea." Infectious Disease Clinics of North America, vol. 19, no. 1, 2005, pp. 137-49.
Shlim DR. Update in traveler's diarrhea. Infect Dis Clin North Am. 2005;19(1):137-49.
Shlim, D. R. (2005). Update in traveler's diarrhea. Infectious Disease Clinics of North America, 19(1), 137-49.
Shlim DR. Update in Traveler's Diarrhea. Infect Dis Clin North Am. 2005;19(1):137-49. PubMed PMID: 15701551.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Update in traveler's diarrhea. A1 - Shlim,David R, PY - 2005/2/11/pubmed PY - 2005/5/5/medline PY - 2005/2/11/entrez SP - 137 EP - 49 JF - Infectious disease clinics of North America JO - Infect Dis Clin North Am VL - 19 IS - 1 N2 - TD has not proved as preventable as hoped, despite knowing that it is transmitted mainly through food. Travelers have little ability to select restaurants based on the kitchen hygiene. The rates of TD in travelers to developing countries have not changed in the past 50 years, either because the dietary precautions they are taught are not effective or they cannot be adhered to in the course of a pleasurable vacation. Nonantibiotic prophylaxis with bismuth subsalicylate has the potential to prevent 40% to 60% of TD episodes in short-term travelers, and is probably underused. Antibiotic prophylaxis can prevent up to 90% of infections, but is not routinely recommended. Empiric treatment of TD has been the best approach to dealing with this problem, but its usefulness is being undermined by growing antibiotic resistance in many parts of the world. Fluoroquinolones are still the most useful agents where Campylobacter is not a predominant pathogen. Rifaximin may prove to be a useful addition to the options for treatment and prophylaxis. If used for treatment, it may require a backup antibiotic in areas where Campylobacter and Shigella are prominent pathogens. SN - 0891-5520 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15701551/Update_in_traveler's_diarrhea_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0891-5520(04)00133-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -