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Hyperglycemia in the hospital setting: the case for improved control among non-diabetics.
Ann Pharmacother. 2005 Mar; 39(3):492-501.AP

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To review studies on the role of hyperglycemia in acutely ill adults, regardless of diabetes diagnosis, and the impact of glucose control on health outcomes.

DATA SOURCES

Searches on Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM), and PubMed MEDLINE, limited to articles written in English, trials conducted on adult subjects, and material published between 1994 and April 2004. Search words included the major MeSH term hyperglycemia and title words glucose, hyperglycemia/hyperglycemic, or insulin therapy, with text words admission, hospitalized, in-hospital, or inpatient.

STUDY SELECTION AND DATA EXTRACTION

All articles identified from the data sources were evaluated, and all information deemed relevant was included in this review.

DATA SYNTHESIS

Hyperglycemia, even in patients without diabetes, has been shown to be detrimental among inpatients in medical and surgical units, as well as in critical care. A review of 25 outcomes studies indicated that the majority of research on this topic used retrospective or prospective cohort designs; only 2 were conducted as randomized controlled studies. In general, the findings demonstrated negative impact on outcomes among various patient populations with hyperglycemia including increased lengths of stay, health complications, utilization of resources, and risk of mortality.

CONCLUSIONS

Studies report that hyperglycemia is a common but detrimental condition and that better control in the hospital setting decreases short- and long-term risk of mortality, illness complications, hospital lengths of stay, and healthcare costs. Increased efforts to treat hyperglycemia and screen for diabetes are needed in the hospital setting. Future studies on cost-effective approaches to glucose control are recommended.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Brain and Spine Center, Seton Healthcare Network, 601 E. 15th Street, Austin, TX 78701-1096, USA. tmconner@seton.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15701779

Citation

Conner, Therese M., et al. "Hyperglycemia in the Hospital Setting: the Case for Improved Control Among Non-diabetics." The Annals of Pharmacotherapy, vol. 39, no. 3, 2005, pp. 492-501.
Conner TM, Flesner-Gurley KR, Barner JC. Hyperglycemia in the hospital setting: the case for improved control among non-diabetics. Ann Pharmacother. 2005;39(3):492-501.
Conner, T. M., Flesner-Gurley, K. R., & Barner, J. C. (2005). Hyperglycemia in the hospital setting: the case for improved control among non-diabetics. The Annals of Pharmacotherapy, 39(3), 492-501.
Conner TM, Flesner-Gurley KR, Barner JC. Hyperglycemia in the Hospital Setting: the Case for Improved Control Among Non-diabetics. Ann Pharmacother. 2005;39(3):492-501. PubMed PMID: 15701779.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hyperglycemia in the hospital setting: the case for improved control among non-diabetics. AU - Conner,Therese M, AU - Flesner-Gurley,Kelly R, AU - Barner,Jamie C, Y1 - 2005/02/08/ PY - 2005/2/11/pubmed PY - 2005/5/7/medline PY - 2005/2/11/entrez SP - 492 EP - 501 JF - The Annals of pharmacotherapy JO - Ann Pharmacother VL - 39 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To review studies on the role of hyperglycemia in acutely ill adults, regardless of diabetes diagnosis, and the impact of glucose control on health outcomes. DATA SOURCES: Searches on Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM), and PubMed MEDLINE, limited to articles written in English, trials conducted on adult subjects, and material published between 1994 and April 2004. Search words included the major MeSH term hyperglycemia and title words glucose, hyperglycemia/hyperglycemic, or insulin therapy, with text words admission, hospitalized, in-hospital, or inpatient. STUDY SELECTION AND DATA EXTRACTION: All articles identified from the data sources were evaluated, and all information deemed relevant was included in this review. DATA SYNTHESIS: Hyperglycemia, even in patients without diabetes, has been shown to be detrimental among inpatients in medical and surgical units, as well as in critical care. A review of 25 outcomes studies indicated that the majority of research on this topic used retrospective or prospective cohort designs; only 2 were conducted as randomized controlled studies. In general, the findings demonstrated negative impact on outcomes among various patient populations with hyperglycemia including increased lengths of stay, health complications, utilization of resources, and risk of mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Studies report that hyperglycemia is a common but detrimental condition and that better control in the hospital setting decreases short- and long-term risk of mortality, illness complications, hospital lengths of stay, and healthcare costs. Increased efforts to treat hyperglycemia and screen for diabetes are needed in the hospital setting. Future studies on cost-effective approaches to glucose control are recommended. SN - 1060-0280 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15701779/Hyperglycemia_in_the_hospital_setting:_the_case_for_improved_control_among_non_diabetics_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1345/aph.1E308?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -