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Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostatitis: prevalence of painful ejaculation in men with clinical BPH.
BJU Int 2005; 95(4):571-4BI

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To determine the prevalence and importance of pain/discomfort on ejaculation (prostatitis-like symptom) in men with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) diagnosed with clinical benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).

PATIENTS AND METHODS

Baseline data from 5096 men reporting LUTS suggestive of BPH, and enrolled in the ALF-ONE study by general practitioners and urologists in Europe, Asia, Latin America, the Middle East and Canada, were analysed to determine the prevalence and significance of pain/discomfort on ejaculation. All the men were asked to complete the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire, the bother score (IPSS question 8), and the Danish Prostate Symptom Score sexual-function questionnaire (DAN-PSSsex) which assesses three symptoms (rigidity of erection, amount of ejaculate and pain/discomfort on ejaculation) and their bothersomeness.

RESULTS

There were 3700 sexually active men who had an evaluable answer to the DAN-PSSsex question related to pain/discomfort on ejaculation. Of these, 688 (18.6%) reported pain/discomfort on ejaculation and 609 (88%) considered it was a problem. Patients with painful ejaculation had more severe LUTS and reported greater bother (P < 0.001). Of men with painful ejaculation, 72% reported erectile dysfunction, of whom 91% considered it a problem, and 75% reported reduced ejaculation, of whom 81% considered it a problem. By contrast, of men with no ejaculatory discomfort, 57% reported erectile dysfunction, of whom 79% considered it a problem, and 56% reported reduced ejaculation, of whom 57% considered it a problem. A history of urinary tract infection was reported by 12% of men in the ejaculatory pain group, compared with 7% in the LUTS-only group, while 5% of men in the ejaculatory pain group reported macroscopic haematuria, compared to 3% in the LUTS-only group. Men with ejaculatory pain were slightly younger, but there were no significant differences in duration of LUTS, history of acute urinary retention, prostate-specific antigen concentrations or maximum urinary flow rate compared to the LUTS-only group.

CONCLUSIONS

Of sexually active men with LUTS suggestive of BPH, approximately 20% complain of specific prostatitis-like symptoms of pain/discomfort on ejaculation, and these men clearly differ from those who present with LUTS only. For most the symptom is a significant bother. Men with BPH and painful ejaculation have more severe LUTS and reported greater bother, and had a higher prevalence of erectile dysfunction and reduced ejaculation, than men with LUTS only. Evaluation and treatment strategies should address this population of men with symptoms suggestive of both prostatitis and BPH.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Urology, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada. jcn@post.queensu.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15705082

Citation

Nickel, J Curtis, et al. "Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) and Prostatitis: Prevalence of Painful Ejaculation in Men With Clinical BPH." BJU International, vol. 95, no. 4, 2005, pp. 571-4.
Nickel JC, Elhilali M, Vallancien G, et al. Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostatitis: prevalence of painful ejaculation in men with clinical BPH. BJU Int. 2005;95(4):571-4.
Nickel, J. C., Elhilali, M., & Vallancien, G. (2005). Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostatitis: prevalence of painful ejaculation in men with clinical BPH. BJU International, 95(4), pp. 571-4.
Nickel JC, et al. Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) and Prostatitis: Prevalence of Painful Ejaculation in Men With Clinical BPH. BJU Int. 2005;95(4):571-4. PubMed PMID: 15705082.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostatitis: prevalence of painful ejaculation in men with clinical BPH. AU - Nickel,J Curtis, AU - Elhilali,Mostafa, AU - Vallancien,Guy, AU - ,, PY - 2005/2/12/pubmed PY - 2005/3/29/medline PY - 2005/2/12/entrez SP - 571 EP - 4 JF - BJU international JO - BJU Int. VL - 95 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence and importance of pain/discomfort on ejaculation (prostatitis-like symptom) in men with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) diagnosed with clinical benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Baseline data from 5096 men reporting LUTS suggestive of BPH, and enrolled in the ALF-ONE study by general practitioners and urologists in Europe, Asia, Latin America, the Middle East and Canada, were analysed to determine the prevalence and significance of pain/discomfort on ejaculation. All the men were asked to complete the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire, the bother score (IPSS question 8), and the Danish Prostate Symptom Score sexual-function questionnaire (DAN-PSSsex) which assesses three symptoms (rigidity of erection, amount of ejaculate and pain/discomfort on ejaculation) and their bothersomeness. RESULTS: There were 3700 sexually active men who had an evaluable answer to the DAN-PSSsex question related to pain/discomfort on ejaculation. Of these, 688 (18.6%) reported pain/discomfort on ejaculation and 609 (88%) considered it was a problem. Patients with painful ejaculation had more severe LUTS and reported greater bother (P < 0.001). Of men with painful ejaculation, 72% reported erectile dysfunction, of whom 91% considered it a problem, and 75% reported reduced ejaculation, of whom 81% considered it a problem. By contrast, of men with no ejaculatory discomfort, 57% reported erectile dysfunction, of whom 79% considered it a problem, and 56% reported reduced ejaculation, of whom 57% considered it a problem. A history of urinary tract infection was reported by 12% of men in the ejaculatory pain group, compared with 7% in the LUTS-only group, while 5% of men in the ejaculatory pain group reported macroscopic haematuria, compared to 3% in the LUTS-only group. Men with ejaculatory pain were slightly younger, but there were no significant differences in duration of LUTS, history of acute urinary retention, prostate-specific antigen concentrations or maximum urinary flow rate compared to the LUTS-only group. CONCLUSIONS: Of sexually active men with LUTS suggestive of BPH, approximately 20% complain of specific prostatitis-like symptoms of pain/discomfort on ejaculation, and these men clearly differ from those who present with LUTS only. For most the symptom is a significant bother. Men with BPH and painful ejaculation have more severe LUTS and reported greater bother, and had a higher prevalence of erectile dysfunction and reduced ejaculation, than men with LUTS only. Evaluation and treatment strategies should address this population of men with symptoms suggestive of both prostatitis and BPH. SN - 1464-4096 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15705082/Benign_prostatic_hyperplasia__BPH__and_prostatitis:_prevalence_of_painful_ejaculation_in_men_with_clinical_BPH_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1464-410X.2005.05341.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -