Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Human salivary alpha-amylase reactivity in a psychosocial stress paradigm.
Int J Psychophysiol. 2005 Mar; 55(3):333-42.IJ

Abstract

Biological indicators for stress reactions are valuable markers in psychophysiological research and clinical practice. Since the release of salivary enzyme alpha-amylase was reported to react to physiological and psychological stressors, we set out to investigate human salivary alpha-amylase changes employing a reliable laboratory stress protocol to investigate the reactivity of salivary alpha-amylase to a brief period of psychosocial stress. In a within-subject repeated-measures design, 24 healthy adults were exposed to the TSST and a control condition on separate days with randomized sequence. Salivary alpha-amylase, salivary cortisol and heart rate were repeatedly measured before, during and after both conditions. Significant differences between psychosocial stress and the rest condition in alpha-amylase activity [F(3.74,86.06)=4.52; P=0.003], cortisol levels [F(4.21,88.32)=12.48; P<0.001] and heart rate [F(1,22)=81.15; P<0.001] were observed, with marked increases before and after stress. The data corroborate findings from other studies that showed increased levels of alpha-amylase before and after psychological stress. We discuss the role of salivary alpha-amylase as a promising candidate for a reliable, noninvasive marker of psychosocial stress.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Psychology, Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, University of Zürich, Zürichbergstr. 43, CH-8044 Zürich, Switzerland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15708646

Citation

Nater, Urs M., et al. "Human Salivary Alpha-amylase Reactivity in a Psychosocial Stress Paradigm." International Journal of Psychophysiology : Official Journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology, vol. 55, no. 3, 2005, pp. 333-42.
Nater UM, Rohleder N, Gaab J, et al. Human salivary alpha-amylase reactivity in a psychosocial stress paradigm. Int J Psychophysiol. 2005;55(3):333-42.
Nater, U. M., Rohleder, N., Gaab, J., Berger, S., Jud, A., Kirschbaum, C., & Ehlert, U. (2005). Human salivary alpha-amylase reactivity in a psychosocial stress paradigm. International Journal of Psychophysiology : Official Journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology, 55(3), 333-42.
Nater UM, et al. Human Salivary Alpha-amylase Reactivity in a Psychosocial Stress Paradigm. Int J Psychophysiol. 2005;55(3):333-42. PubMed PMID: 15708646.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Human salivary alpha-amylase reactivity in a psychosocial stress paradigm. AU - Nater,Urs M, AU - Rohleder,Nicolas, AU - Gaab,Jens, AU - Berger,Simona, AU - Jud,Andreas, AU - Kirschbaum,Clemens, AU - Ehlert,Ulrike, PY - 2004/03/02/received PY - 2004/05/20/revised PY - 2004/09/09/accepted PY - 2005/2/15/pubmed PY - 2005/7/16/medline PY - 2005/2/15/entrez SP - 333 EP - 42 JF - International journal of psychophysiology : official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology JO - Int J Psychophysiol VL - 55 IS - 3 N2 - Biological indicators for stress reactions are valuable markers in psychophysiological research and clinical practice. Since the release of salivary enzyme alpha-amylase was reported to react to physiological and psychological stressors, we set out to investigate human salivary alpha-amylase changes employing a reliable laboratory stress protocol to investigate the reactivity of salivary alpha-amylase to a brief period of psychosocial stress. In a within-subject repeated-measures design, 24 healthy adults were exposed to the TSST and a control condition on separate days with randomized sequence. Salivary alpha-amylase, salivary cortisol and heart rate were repeatedly measured before, during and after both conditions. Significant differences between psychosocial stress and the rest condition in alpha-amylase activity [F(3.74,86.06)=4.52; P=0.003], cortisol levels [F(4.21,88.32)=12.48; P<0.001] and heart rate [F(1,22)=81.15; P<0.001] were observed, with marked increases before and after stress. The data corroborate findings from other studies that showed increased levels of alpha-amylase before and after psychological stress. We discuss the role of salivary alpha-amylase as a promising candidate for a reliable, noninvasive marker of psychosocial stress. SN - 0167-8760 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15708646/Human_salivary_alpha_amylase_reactivity_in_a_psychosocial_stress_paradigm_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0167-8760(04)00184-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -