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Cognitive deterioration and electrical status epilepticus during slow sleep.
Epilepsy Behav. 2005 Mar; 6(2):167-73.EB

Abstract

The results of long-term follow-up of 10 children with global or specific cognitive deterioration and, on the electroencephalogram, electrical status epilepticus during sleep (ESES) are described. They were referred because of cognitive deterioration and underwent repeated neurological and neuropsychological examinations and all-night electroencephalography. A previous cognitive level was known or could be estimated in all. Seven children had a continuous spikes and waves during sleep (CSWS) syndrome, with global cognitive deterioration in four and more specific cognitive decline in three, and another three children had Landau-Kleffner syndrome (LKS). Of the last three, two children never had seizures, while the other had localization-related epilepsy. No children experienced aggravation of clinical seizures. However, therapy was disappointing. Cognitive dysfunction did not respond to valproate and/or benzodiazepines in 9 of the 10 children. A frontal epileptic focus was found in 5 of 7 children with CSWS, and a left temporal focus in 2 of 3 children with LKS. The ESES persisted in CSWS for 5-9 years and in LKS for 1-5 years, and disappeared at puberty. Good cognitive recovery after disappearance of ESES occurred in only one child, and partial recovery in four. An unfavorable prognosis of cognitive deterioration seems to be related to long-duration ESES and/or early onset epileptic activity. The authors are of the opinion that cognitive deterioration in children, with or without manifest epileptic seizures, should mandate electroencephalographic investigation during sleep.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Gemini Hospital, Den Helder, The Netherlands. fscholtes@gemini-ziekenhuis.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15710299

Citation

Scholtes, F B J., et al. "Cognitive Deterioration and Electrical Status Epilepticus During Slow Sleep." Epilepsy & Behavior : E&B, vol. 6, no. 2, 2005, pp. 167-73.
Scholtes FB, Hendriks MP, Renier WO. Cognitive deterioration and electrical status epilepticus during slow sleep. Epilepsy Behav. 2005;6(2):167-73.
Scholtes, F. B., Hendriks, M. P., & Renier, W. O. (2005). Cognitive deterioration and electrical status epilepticus during slow sleep. Epilepsy & Behavior : E&B, 6(2), 167-73.
Scholtes FB, Hendriks MP, Renier WO. Cognitive Deterioration and Electrical Status Epilepticus During Slow Sleep. Epilepsy Behav. 2005;6(2):167-73. PubMed PMID: 15710299.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cognitive deterioration and electrical status epilepticus during slow sleep. AU - Scholtes,F B J, AU - Hendriks,M P H, AU - Renier,W O, PY - 2003/11/17/received PY - 2004/10/18/revised PY - 2004/11/05/accepted PY - 2005/2/16/pubmed PY - 2005/5/10/medline PY - 2005/2/16/entrez SP - 167 EP - 73 JF - Epilepsy & behavior : E&B JO - Epilepsy Behav VL - 6 IS - 2 N2 - The results of long-term follow-up of 10 children with global or specific cognitive deterioration and, on the electroencephalogram, electrical status epilepticus during sleep (ESES) are described. They were referred because of cognitive deterioration and underwent repeated neurological and neuropsychological examinations and all-night electroencephalography. A previous cognitive level was known or could be estimated in all. Seven children had a continuous spikes and waves during sleep (CSWS) syndrome, with global cognitive deterioration in four and more specific cognitive decline in three, and another three children had Landau-Kleffner syndrome (LKS). Of the last three, two children never had seizures, while the other had localization-related epilepsy. No children experienced aggravation of clinical seizures. However, therapy was disappointing. Cognitive dysfunction did not respond to valproate and/or benzodiazepines in 9 of the 10 children. A frontal epileptic focus was found in 5 of 7 children with CSWS, and a left temporal focus in 2 of 3 children with LKS. The ESES persisted in CSWS for 5-9 years and in LKS for 1-5 years, and disappeared at puberty. Good cognitive recovery after disappearance of ESES occurred in only one child, and partial recovery in four. An unfavorable prognosis of cognitive deterioration seems to be related to long-duration ESES and/or early onset epileptic activity. The authors are of the opinion that cognitive deterioration in children, with or without manifest epileptic seizures, should mandate electroencephalographic investigation during sleep. SN - 1525-5050 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15710299/Cognitive_deterioration_and_electrical_status_epilepticus_during_slow_sleep_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1525-5050(04)00336-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -