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Coffee, tea, and caffeine consumption and incidence of colon and rectal cancer.
J Natl Cancer Inst 2005; 97(4):282-92JNCI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Frequent coffee consumption has been associated with a reduced risk of colorectal cancer in a number of case-control studies. Cohort studies have not revealed such an association but were limited in size. We explored the association between consumption of coffee and tea and the incidence of colorectal cancer in two large prospective cohorts of women and men.

METHODS

We used data from the Nurses' Health Study (women) and the Health Professionals' Follow-up Study (men). Consumption of coffee and tea and total caffeine intake were assessed and updated in 1980, 1984, 1986, 1990, and 1994 among women and in 1986, 1990, and 1994 among men. The incidence of cancer of the colon or rectum was ascertained through 1998. Hazard ratios were calculated using Cox proportional hazards models that adjusted for potential confounders. All tests of statistical significance were two-sided.

RESULTS

During almost 2 million person-years of follow-up, 1438 cases of colorectal cancer were observed. Consumption of caffeinated coffee or tea with caffeine or caffeine intake was not associated with the incidence of colon or rectal cancer in either cohort. For both cohorts combined, the covariate-adjusted hazard ratio for colorectal cancer associated with consumption of each additional cup of caffeinated coffee was 0.99 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.96 to 1.03). However, participants who regularly consumed two or more cups of decaffeinated coffee per day had a 52% (95% CI = 19% to 71%) lower incidence of rectal cancer than those who never consumed decaffeinated coffee.

CONCLUSIONS

Consumption of caffeinated coffee, tea with caffeine, or caffeine was not associated with incidence of colon of rectal cancer, whereas regular consumption of decaffeinated coffee was associated with a reduced incidence of rectal cancer.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Obstetrics and Gynecology Epidemiology Center, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, 221 Longwood Ave., Boston, MA 02115, USA. kmichels@rics.bwh.harvard.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15713963

Citation

Michels, Karin B., et al. "Coffee, Tea, and Caffeine Consumption and Incidence of Colon and Rectal Cancer." Journal of the National Cancer Institute, vol. 97, no. 4, 2005, pp. 282-92.
Michels KB, Willett WC, Fuchs CS, et al. Coffee, tea, and caffeine consumption and incidence of colon and rectal cancer. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2005;97(4):282-92.
Michels, K. B., Willett, W. C., Fuchs, C. S., & Giovannucci, E. (2005). Coffee, tea, and caffeine consumption and incidence of colon and rectal cancer. Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 97(4), pp. 282-92.
Michels KB, et al. Coffee, Tea, and Caffeine Consumption and Incidence of Colon and Rectal Cancer. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2005 Feb 16;97(4):282-92. PubMed PMID: 15713963.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Coffee, tea, and caffeine consumption and incidence of colon and rectal cancer. AU - Michels,Karin B, AU - Willett,Walter C, AU - Fuchs,Charles S, AU - Giovannucci,Edward, PY - 2005/2/17/pubmed PY - 2005/2/23/medline PY - 2005/2/17/entrez SP - 282 EP - 92 JF - Journal of the National Cancer Institute JO - J. Natl. Cancer Inst. VL - 97 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Frequent coffee consumption has been associated with a reduced risk of colorectal cancer in a number of case-control studies. Cohort studies have not revealed such an association but were limited in size. We explored the association between consumption of coffee and tea and the incidence of colorectal cancer in two large prospective cohorts of women and men. METHODS: We used data from the Nurses' Health Study (women) and the Health Professionals' Follow-up Study (men). Consumption of coffee and tea and total caffeine intake were assessed and updated in 1980, 1984, 1986, 1990, and 1994 among women and in 1986, 1990, and 1994 among men. The incidence of cancer of the colon or rectum was ascertained through 1998. Hazard ratios were calculated using Cox proportional hazards models that adjusted for potential confounders. All tests of statistical significance were two-sided. RESULTS: During almost 2 million person-years of follow-up, 1438 cases of colorectal cancer were observed. Consumption of caffeinated coffee or tea with caffeine or caffeine intake was not associated with the incidence of colon or rectal cancer in either cohort. For both cohorts combined, the covariate-adjusted hazard ratio for colorectal cancer associated with consumption of each additional cup of caffeinated coffee was 0.99 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.96 to 1.03). However, participants who regularly consumed two or more cups of decaffeinated coffee per day had a 52% (95% CI = 19% to 71%) lower incidence of rectal cancer than those who never consumed decaffeinated coffee. CONCLUSIONS: Consumption of caffeinated coffee, tea with caffeine, or caffeine was not associated with incidence of colon of rectal cancer, whereas regular consumption of decaffeinated coffee was associated with a reduced incidence of rectal cancer. SN - 1460-2105 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15713963/Coffee_tea_and_caffeine_consumption_and_incidence_of_colon_and_rectal_cancer_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jnci/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jnci/dji039 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -