Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Neurofeedback in adolescents and adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

Abstract

Neurofeedback is being utilized more commonly today in treating individuals who have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Neurofeedback, which is based on theories that recognize the organic basis of ADHD, utilizes biofeedback to guide individuals to regulate their brain activity. Neurofeedback relies on research that has demonstrated that most individuals who have ADHD, as compared to matched peers, have excess slow wave activity and reduced fast wave activity. It provides immediate feedback to the individual about his or her brain wave activity in the form of a video game, whose action is influenced by the individual's meeting predetermined thresholds of brain activity. Over several sessions of using the video and auditory feedback, individuals reduce their slow wave activity and/or increase their fast wave activity. Individuals who complete a course of training sessions often show reduced primary ADHD symptoms. Research has shown that neurofeedback outcomes compare favorably to those of stimulant medication.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ADDVANTAGE, PLLC, Richmond, VA 23226, USA. sbutnik@gmail.com

    Source

    Journal of clinical psychology 61:5 2005 May pg 621-5

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Adult
    Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
    Auditory Perception
    Biofeedback, Psychology
    Brain
    Child
    Electroencephalography
    Health Care Costs
    Humans
    Male
    Prognosis
    Treatment Outcome
    Video Games

    Pub Type(s)

    Case Reports
    Comparative Study
    Journal Article
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    15723361

    Citation

    Butnik, Steven M.. "Neurofeedback in Adolescents and Adults With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder." Journal of Clinical Psychology, vol. 61, no. 5, 2005, pp. 621-5.
    Butnik SM. Neurofeedback in adolescents and adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. J Clin Psychol. 2005;61(5):621-5.
    Butnik, S. M. (2005). Neurofeedback in adolescents and adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 61(5), pp. 621-5.
    Butnik SM. Neurofeedback in Adolescents and Adults With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. J Clin Psychol. 2005;61(5):621-5. PubMed PMID: 15723361.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Neurofeedback in adolescents and adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. A1 - Butnik,Steven M, PY - 2005/2/22/pubmed PY - 2005/9/22/medline PY - 2005/2/22/entrez SP - 621 EP - 5 JF - Journal of clinical psychology JO - J Clin Psychol VL - 61 IS - 5 N2 - Neurofeedback is being utilized more commonly today in treating individuals who have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Neurofeedback, which is based on theories that recognize the organic basis of ADHD, utilizes biofeedback to guide individuals to regulate their brain activity. Neurofeedback relies on research that has demonstrated that most individuals who have ADHD, as compared to matched peers, have excess slow wave activity and reduced fast wave activity. It provides immediate feedback to the individual about his or her brain wave activity in the form of a video game, whose action is influenced by the individual's meeting predetermined thresholds of brain activity. Over several sessions of using the video and auditory feedback, individuals reduce their slow wave activity and/or increase their fast wave activity. Individuals who complete a course of training sessions often show reduced primary ADHD symptoms. Research has shown that neurofeedback outcomes compare favorably to those of stimulant medication. SN - 0021-9762 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15723361/full_citation L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/jclp.20124 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -