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Intratympanic dexamethasone injections as a treatment for severe, disabling tinnitus: does it work?
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2005 Feb; 131(2):113-7.AO

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To test the effectiveness of intratympanic dexamethasone injections as a treatment for severe disabling cochlear tinnitus.

DESIGN

Randomized, prospective, single-blind study.

SETTING

Academic tertiary referral hospital.

PATIENTS

Thirty-six patients with severe disabling tinnitus predominantly of cochlear origin were randomly assigned to receive intratympanic injections of a dexamethasone solution or isotonic sodium chloride (saline) solution.

INTERVENTIONS

Under topical anesthesia and after randomization, 36 patients received 0.5-mL intratympanic injections once per week for 4 weeks of either a 4-mg/mL dexamethasone solution or saline solution. Five patients were excluded from analysis because they did not complete the treatment or did not return for follow-up.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE

Improvement of tinnitus measured with a visual analog scale.

RESULTS

The 2 groups were similar in age, sex, tinnitus laterality, measurement of tinnitus intensity on the visual analog scale, and main otologic diagnosis. We considered a 2-point improvement on the visual analog scale to be significant. Twenty-nine percent of the ears in the saline group and 33% of the ears in the dexamethasone group showed significant improvement immediately after completion of treatment. These measurements were not significantly different from each other. Follow-up varied from 13 to 31 months, and the patients with improved tinnitus returned to the initial measurements over time.

CONCLUSIONS

There was no advantage in intratympanic injections of dexamethasone over saline solution in the treatment of severe, disabling tinnitus. Both solutions produced a placebolike improvement.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Otolaryngology, Brasília University Medical School, Brasília, Brazil.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15723941

Citation

Araújo, Mercedes F S., et al. "Intratympanic Dexamethasone Injections as a Treatment for Severe, Disabling Tinnitus: Does It Work?" Archives of Otolaryngology--head & Neck Surgery, vol. 131, no. 2, 2005, pp. 113-7.
Araújo MF, Oliveira CA, Bahmad FM. Intratympanic dexamethasone injections as a treatment for severe, disabling tinnitus: does it work? Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2005;131(2):113-7.
Araújo, M. F., Oliveira, C. A., & Bahmad, F. M. (2005). Intratympanic dexamethasone injections as a treatment for severe, disabling tinnitus: does it work? Archives of Otolaryngology--head & Neck Surgery, 131(2), 113-7.
Araújo MF, Oliveira CA, Bahmad FM. Intratympanic Dexamethasone Injections as a Treatment for Severe, Disabling Tinnitus: Does It Work. Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2005;131(2):113-7. PubMed PMID: 15723941.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intratympanic dexamethasone injections as a treatment for severe, disabling tinnitus: does it work? AU - Araújo,Mercedes F S, AU - Oliveira,Carlos A, AU - Bahmad,Fayez M,Jr PY - 2005/2/23/pubmed PY - 2005/3/19/medline PY - 2005/2/23/entrez SP - 113 EP - 7 JF - Archives of otolaryngology--head & neck surgery JO - Arch. Otolaryngol. Head Neck Surg. VL - 131 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To test the effectiveness of intratympanic dexamethasone injections as a treatment for severe disabling cochlear tinnitus. DESIGN: Randomized, prospective, single-blind study. SETTING: Academic tertiary referral hospital. PATIENTS: Thirty-six patients with severe disabling tinnitus predominantly of cochlear origin were randomly assigned to receive intratympanic injections of a dexamethasone solution or isotonic sodium chloride (saline) solution. INTERVENTIONS: Under topical anesthesia and after randomization, 36 patients received 0.5-mL intratympanic injections once per week for 4 weeks of either a 4-mg/mL dexamethasone solution or saline solution. Five patients were excluded from analysis because they did not complete the treatment or did not return for follow-up. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Improvement of tinnitus measured with a visual analog scale. RESULTS: The 2 groups were similar in age, sex, tinnitus laterality, measurement of tinnitus intensity on the visual analog scale, and main otologic diagnosis. We considered a 2-point improvement on the visual analog scale to be significant. Twenty-nine percent of the ears in the saline group and 33% of the ears in the dexamethasone group showed significant improvement immediately after completion of treatment. These measurements were not significantly different from each other. Follow-up varied from 13 to 31 months, and the patients with improved tinnitus returned to the initial measurements over time. CONCLUSIONS: There was no advantage in intratympanic injections of dexamethasone over saline solution in the treatment of severe, disabling tinnitus. Both solutions produced a placebolike improvement. SN - 0886-4470 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15723941/Intratympanic_dexamethasone_injections_as_a_treatment_for_severe_disabling_tinnitus:_does_it_work L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaotolaryngology/fullarticle/10.1001/archotol.131.2.113 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -