Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

[Guidelines for dialysis. Replacement therapy for acute renal failure in critically ill patients].
G Ital Nefrol. 2004 May-Jun; 21 Suppl 28:S1-10.GI

Abstract

Acute renal failure (ARF) in patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) is mostly caused by ischemic or toxic injury, with a higher incidence in the latest years due to the growing number of interventions in cardiac and vascular surgery and to the general enhancement of reanimation techniques, which allow a better outcome among ICU patients. In critically ill patients, the ARF incidence reported in the literature ranges between 1 and 25%. Among ICU patients with ARF the mortality is between 40 and 65%, much more than in patients without this complication. Higher mortality rates, longer hospitalisation times and higher therapy costs demand from us an early diagnosis and treatment of ARF. Due to the lack of controlled and randomized proofs, recommended criteria for starting renal replacement therapy (RRT) in critical ARF patients might overlap with those for ESRD therapy. Moreover, randomised and controlled trials, confirming the actual efficacy of early onset of RRT on the mortality rate, are not yet available. As for stable ESRD patients, a direct relationship between dialytic doses and mortality and morbidity has been established for ARF patients. For ARF patients, as well as for ESRD patients, a minimum Kt/V of 1.2 three times a week should be ensured, although higher doses for critical ARF patients may achieve better results. The choice between intermittent (IRRT) and continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) in these patients is still a controversial issue. In spite of the fact that most studies report a better outcome in patients treated with CRRT, a recent meta-analysis failed to demonstrate any difference on the relative risk (RR) of mortality and on the rate of renal recovery between patients treated with either IRRT or CRRT. Furthermore, the use of peritoneal dialysis for the treatment of ARF patients in ICU has not been dismissed yet; so far this is indeed considered to be the technique of choice in some specific clinical situations. The intrinsic urgency of dialysis in ARF patients entails the use of temporary central venous catheters. The internal right jugular vein is usually preferred for these catheters because of the easier insertion and the lower risk of stenosis and thrombosis. The anticoagulant procedure should be chosen on the basis of patient characteristics, treatment typology and the likelihood of effectively monitoring its action. The choice of buffers in the dialysate, mostly lactate or bicarbonate, should depend on patient characteristics; so far, however, controlled but not randomized studies do not show any significant difference in the correction of metabolic acidosis between lactate and bicarbonate.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

English Abstract
Guideline
Journal Article
Practice Guideline

Language

ita

PubMed ID

15724231

Citation

Fuiano, G, et al. "[Guidelines for Dialysis. Replacement Therapy for Acute Renal Failure in Critically Ill Patients]." Giornale Italiano Di Nefrologia : Organo Ufficiale Della Societa Italiana Di Nefrologia, vol. 21 Suppl 28, 2004, pp. S1-10.
Fuiano G, Di Filippo S, Memoli B, et al. [Guidelines for dialysis. Replacement therapy for acute renal failure in critically ill patients]. G Ital Nefrol. 2004;21 Suppl 28:S1-10.
Fuiano, G., Di Filippo, S., Memoli, B., Cioffi, M., Caglioti, A., & Mazza, G. (2004). [Guidelines for dialysis. Replacement therapy for acute renal failure in critically ill patients]. Giornale Italiano Di Nefrologia : Organo Ufficiale Della Societa Italiana Di Nefrologia, 21 Suppl 28, S1-10.
Fuiano G, et al. [Guidelines for Dialysis. Replacement Therapy for Acute Renal Failure in Critically Ill Patients]. G Ital Nefrol. 2004 May-Jun;21 Suppl 28:S1-10. PubMed PMID: 15724231.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Guidelines for dialysis. Replacement therapy for acute renal failure in critically ill patients]. AU - Fuiano,G, AU - Di Filippo,S, AU - Memoli,B, AU - Cioffi,M, AU - Caglioti,A, AU - Mazza,G, AU - ,, PY - 2005/2/23/pubmed PY - 2005/3/30/medline PY - 2005/2/23/entrez SP - S1 EP - 10 JF - Giornale italiano di nefrologia : organo ufficiale della Societa italiana di nefrologia JO - G Ital Nefrol VL - 21 Suppl 28 N2 - Acute renal failure (ARF) in patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) is mostly caused by ischemic or toxic injury, with a higher incidence in the latest years due to the growing number of interventions in cardiac and vascular surgery and to the general enhancement of reanimation techniques, which allow a better outcome among ICU patients. In critically ill patients, the ARF incidence reported in the literature ranges between 1 and 25%. Among ICU patients with ARF the mortality is between 40 and 65%, much more than in patients without this complication. Higher mortality rates, longer hospitalisation times and higher therapy costs demand from us an early diagnosis and treatment of ARF. Due to the lack of controlled and randomized proofs, recommended criteria for starting renal replacement therapy (RRT) in critical ARF patients might overlap with those for ESRD therapy. Moreover, randomised and controlled trials, confirming the actual efficacy of early onset of RRT on the mortality rate, are not yet available. As for stable ESRD patients, a direct relationship between dialytic doses and mortality and morbidity has been established for ARF patients. For ARF patients, as well as for ESRD patients, a minimum Kt/V of 1.2 three times a week should be ensured, although higher doses for critical ARF patients may achieve better results. The choice between intermittent (IRRT) and continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) in these patients is still a controversial issue. In spite of the fact that most studies report a better outcome in patients treated with CRRT, a recent meta-analysis failed to demonstrate any difference on the relative risk (RR) of mortality and on the rate of renal recovery between patients treated with either IRRT or CRRT. Furthermore, the use of peritoneal dialysis for the treatment of ARF patients in ICU has not been dismissed yet; so far this is indeed considered to be the technique of choice in some specific clinical situations. The intrinsic urgency of dialysis in ARF patients entails the use of temporary central venous catheters. The internal right jugular vein is usually preferred for these catheters because of the easier insertion and the lower risk of stenosis and thrombosis. The anticoagulant procedure should be chosen on the basis of patient characteristics, treatment typology and the likelihood of effectively monitoring its action. The choice of buffers in the dialysate, mostly lactate or bicarbonate, should depend on patient characteristics; so far, however, controlled but not randomized studies do not show any significant difference in the correction of metabolic acidosis between lactate and bicarbonate. SN - 0393-5590 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15724231/[Guidelines_for_dialysis__Replacement_therapy_for_acute_renal_failure_in_critically_ill_patients]_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -