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Motion sickness: its pathophysiology and treatment.
Int Tinnitus J. 2004; 10(2):132-6.IT

Abstract

The pathogenesis of motion sickness includes both inner-ear stimulation by body movement, especially a Coriolis-type stimulus, and optokinetic stimulation due to the shift of the surrounding visual fields. According to Kornhuber, Sakata and others, the vestibular cerebellum also participates in an important way. We conducted this study to elucidate the influence of the vestibular cerebellum on the development of motion sickness. We initially focused attention on the visual suppression test of Takemori et al. as a test for vestibular cerebellar function. We reported a modification of this test, described as postrotatoric nystagmus. We employed this test as a rotatoric visual suppression test using milder stimulus for patients complaining of motion sickness. The pathogenesis and treatment of motion sickness are also discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Vertigo, Disequilibrium, and Tinnitus Diseases, Tokyo, Japan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15732510

Citation

Sakata, Eiji, et al. "Motion Sickness: Its Pathophysiology and Treatment." The International Tinnitus Journal, vol. 10, no. 2, 2004, pp. 132-6.
Sakata E, Ohtsu K, Sakata H. Motion sickness: its pathophysiology and treatment. Int Tinnitus J. 2004;10(2):132-6.
Sakata, E., Ohtsu, K., & Sakata, H. (2004). Motion sickness: its pathophysiology and treatment. The International Tinnitus Journal, 10(2), 132-6.
Sakata E, Ohtsu K, Sakata H. Motion Sickness: Its Pathophysiology and Treatment. Int Tinnitus J. 2004;10(2):132-6. PubMed PMID: 15732510.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Motion sickness: its pathophysiology and treatment. AU - Sakata,Eiji, AU - Ohtsu,Kyoko, AU - Sakata,Hideaki, PY - 2005/3/1/pubmed PY - 2005/10/15/medline PY - 2005/3/1/entrez SP - 132 EP - 6 JF - The international tinnitus journal JO - Int Tinnitus J VL - 10 IS - 2 N2 - The pathogenesis of motion sickness includes both inner-ear stimulation by body movement, especially a Coriolis-type stimulus, and optokinetic stimulation due to the shift of the surrounding visual fields. According to Kornhuber, Sakata and others, the vestibular cerebellum also participates in an important way. We conducted this study to elucidate the influence of the vestibular cerebellum on the development of motion sickness. We initially focused attention on the visual suppression test of Takemori et al. as a test for vestibular cerebellar function. We reported a modification of this test, described as postrotatoric nystagmus. We employed this test as a rotatoric visual suppression test using milder stimulus for patients complaining of motion sickness. The pathogenesis and treatment of motion sickness are also discussed. SN - 0946-5448 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15732510/Motion_sickness:_its_pathophysiology_and_treatment_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/motionsickness.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -