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Thiamine, pyridoxine, cyanocobalamin and their combination inhibit thermal, but not mechanical hyperalgesia in rats with primary sensory neuron injury.
Pain. 2005 Mar; 114(1-2):266-77.PAIN

Abstract

Neuropathic pain after nerve injury is severe and intractable, and current drugs and nondrug therapies offer substantial pain relief to no more than half of affected patients. The present study investigated the analgesic roles of the B vitamins thiamine (B1), pyridoxine (B6) and cyanocobalamin (B12) in rats with neuropathic pain caused by spinal ganglia compression (CCD) or loose ligation of the sciatic nerve (CCI). Thermal hyperalgesia was determined by a significantly shortened latency of foot withdrawal to radiant heat, and mechanical hyperalgesia was determined by a significantly decreased threshold of foot withdrawal to von Frey filaments stimulation of the plantar surface of hindpaw. Results showed that (1) intraperitoneal injection of B1 (5, 10, 33 and 100 mg/kg), B6 (33 and 100 mg/kg) or B12 (0.5 and 2 mg/kg) significantly reduced thermal hyperalgesia; (2) the combination of B1, B6 and B12 synergistically inhibited thermal hyperalgesia; (3) repetitive administration of vitamin B complex (containing B1/B6/B12 33/33/0.5 mg/kg, for 1 and 2 wk) produced long-term inhibition of thermal hyperalgesia; and (4) B vitamins did not affect mechanical hyperalgesia or normal pain sensation, and exhibited similar effects on CCD and CCI induced-hyperalgesia. The present studies demonstrate effects of B vitamins on pain and hyperalgesia following primary sensory neurons injury, and suggest the possible clinical utility of B vitamins in the treatment of neuropathic painful conditions following injury, inflammation, degeneration or other disorders in the nervous systems in human beings.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurobiology, Parker Research Institute, 2500 Walnut Hill Lane, Dallas, TX 75229, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15733653

Citation

Wang, Zheng-Bei, et al. "Thiamine, Pyridoxine, Cyanocobalamin and Their Combination Inhibit Thermal, but Not Mechanical Hyperalgesia in Rats With Primary Sensory Neuron Injury." Pain, vol. 114, no. 1-2, 2005, pp. 266-77.
Wang ZB, Gan Q, Rupert RL, et al. Thiamine, pyridoxine, cyanocobalamin and their combination inhibit thermal, but not mechanical hyperalgesia in rats with primary sensory neuron injury. Pain. 2005;114(1-2):266-77.
Wang, Z. B., Gan, Q., Rupert, R. L., Zeng, Y. M., & Song, X. J. (2005). Thiamine, pyridoxine, cyanocobalamin and their combination inhibit thermal, but not mechanical hyperalgesia in rats with primary sensory neuron injury. Pain, 114(1-2), 266-77.
Wang ZB, et al. Thiamine, Pyridoxine, Cyanocobalamin and Their Combination Inhibit Thermal, but Not Mechanical Hyperalgesia in Rats With Primary Sensory Neuron Injury. Pain. 2005;114(1-2):266-77. PubMed PMID: 15733653.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Thiamine, pyridoxine, cyanocobalamin and their combination inhibit thermal, but not mechanical hyperalgesia in rats with primary sensory neuron injury. AU - Wang,Zheng-Bei, AU - Gan,Qiang, AU - Rupert,Ronald L, AU - Zeng,Yin-Ming, AU - Song,Xue-Jun, Y1 - 2005/01/26/ PY - 2004/07/14/received PY - 2004/11/12/revised PY - 2004/12/20/accepted PY - 2005/3/1/pubmed PY - 2005/5/17/medline PY - 2005/3/1/entrez SP - 266 EP - 77 JF - Pain JO - Pain VL - 114 IS - 1-2 N2 - Neuropathic pain after nerve injury is severe and intractable, and current drugs and nondrug therapies offer substantial pain relief to no more than half of affected patients. The present study investigated the analgesic roles of the B vitamins thiamine (B1), pyridoxine (B6) and cyanocobalamin (B12) in rats with neuropathic pain caused by spinal ganglia compression (CCD) or loose ligation of the sciatic nerve (CCI). Thermal hyperalgesia was determined by a significantly shortened latency of foot withdrawal to radiant heat, and mechanical hyperalgesia was determined by a significantly decreased threshold of foot withdrawal to von Frey filaments stimulation of the plantar surface of hindpaw. Results showed that (1) intraperitoneal injection of B1 (5, 10, 33 and 100 mg/kg), B6 (33 and 100 mg/kg) or B12 (0.5 and 2 mg/kg) significantly reduced thermal hyperalgesia; (2) the combination of B1, B6 and B12 synergistically inhibited thermal hyperalgesia; (3) repetitive administration of vitamin B complex (containing B1/B6/B12 33/33/0.5 mg/kg, for 1 and 2 wk) produced long-term inhibition of thermal hyperalgesia; and (4) B vitamins did not affect mechanical hyperalgesia or normal pain sensation, and exhibited similar effects on CCD and CCI induced-hyperalgesia. The present studies demonstrate effects of B vitamins on pain and hyperalgesia following primary sensory neurons injury, and suggest the possible clinical utility of B vitamins in the treatment of neuropathic painful conditions following injury, inflammation, degeneration or other disorders in the nervous systems in human beings. SN - 0304-3959 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15733653/Thiamine_pyridoxine_cyanocobalamin_and_their_combination_inhibit_thermal_but_not_mechanical_hyperalgesia_in_rats_with_primary_sensory_neuron_injury_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0304-3959(04)00614-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -