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The combination of high fruit and vegetable and low saturated fat intakes is more protective against mortality in aging men than is either alone: the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging.

Abstract

Saturated fat (SF) intake contributes to the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality. Recently, the protective effects of fruit and vegetable (FV) intake on both CHD and all-cause mortality were documented. However, individuals consuming more FV may be displacing higher-fat foods. Therefore, we investigated the individual and combined effects of FV and SF consumption on total and CHD mortality among 501 initially healthy men in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA). Over a mean 18 y of follow-up, 7-d diet records were taken at 1-7 visits. Cause of death was ascertained from death certificates, hospital records, and autopsy data. After adjustment for age, total energy intake, BMI, smoking, alcohol use, dietary supplements, and physical activity score, FV and SF intakes were individually associated with lower all-cause and CHD mortality (P < 0.05). When both FV and SF were included in the same model, associations of each were attenuated with CHD mortality, and no longer significant for all-cause mortality. Men consuming the combination of > or =5 servings of FV/d and < or =12% energy from SF were 31% less likely to die of any cause (P < 0.05), and 76% less likely to die from CHD (P < 0.001), relative to those consuming < 5 FV and >12% SF. Men consuming either low SF or high FV, but not both, did not have a significantly lower risk of total mortality; but did have 64-67% lower risk of CHD mortality (P < 0.05) relative to those doing neither. These results confirm the protective effects of low SF and high FV intake against CHD mortality. In addition, they extend these findings by demonstrating that the combination of both behaviors is more protective than either alone, suggesting that their beneficial effects are mediated by different mechanisms.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, Tufts University, Boston, MA, USA. katharine.tucker@tufts.edu

    , , , , ,

    Source

    The Journal of nutrition 135:3 2005 Mar pg 556-61

    MeSH

    Adult
    Aged
    Aging
    Baltimore
    Coronary Disease
    Diet Records
    Diet, Fat-Restricted
    Fruit
    Humans
    Life Style
    Longitudinal Studies
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Proportional Hazards Models
    Survival Analysis
    Vegetables

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    15735093

    Citation

    Tucker, Katherine L., et al. "The Combination of High Fruit and Vegetable and Low Saturated Fat Intakes Is More Protective Against Mortality in Aging Men Than Is Either Alone: the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 135, no. 3, 2005, pp. 556-61.
    Tucker KL, Hallfrisch J, Qiao N, et al. The combination of high fruit and vegetable and low saturated fat intakes is more protective against mortality in aging men than is either alone: the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. J Nutr. 2005;135(3):556-61.
    Tucker, K. L., Hallfrisch, J., Qiao, N., Muller, D., Andres, R., & Fleg, J. L. (2005). The combination of high fruit and vegetable and low saturated fat intakes is more protective against mortality in aging men than is either alone: the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. The Journal of Nutrition, 135(3), pp. 556-61.
    Tucker KL, et al. The Combination of High Fruit and Vegetable and Low Saturated Fat Intakes Is More Protective Against Mortality in Aging Men Than Is Either Alone: the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. J Nutr. 2005;135(3):556-61. PubMed PMID: 15735093.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - The combination of high fruit and vegetable and low saturated fat intakes is more protective against mortality in aging men than is either alone: the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. AU - Tucker,Katherine L, AU - Hallfrisch,Judith, AU - Qiao,Ning, AU - Muller,Denis, AU - Andres,Reubin, AU - Fleg,Jerome L, AU - ,, PY - 2005/3/1/pubmed PY - 2005/4/15/medline PY - 2005/3/1/entrez SP - 556 EP - 61 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J. Nutr. VL - 135 IS - 3 N2 - Saturated fat (SF) intake contributes to the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality. Recently, the protective effects of fruit and vegetable (FV) intake on both CHD and all-cause mortality were documented. However, individuals consuming more FV may be displacing higher-fat foods. Therefore, we investigated the individual and combined effects of FV and SF consumption on total and CHD mortality among 501 initially healthy men in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA). Over a mean 18 y of follow-up, 7-d diet records were taken at 1-7 visits. Cause of death was ascertained from death certificates, hospital records, and autopsy data. After adjustment for age, total energy intake, BMI, smoking, alcohol use, dietary supplements, and physical activity score, FV and SF intakes were individually associated with lower all-cause and CHD mortality (P < 0.05). When both FV and SF were included in the same model, associations of each were attenuated with CHD mortality, and no longer significant for all-cause mortality. Men consuming the combination of > or =5 servings of FV/d and < or =12% energy from SF were 31% less likely to die of any cause (P < 0.05), and 76% less likely to die from CHD (P < 0.001), relative to those consuming < 5 FV and >12% SF. Men consuming either low SF or high FV, but not both, did not have a significantly lower risk of total mortality; but did have 64-67% lower risk of CHD mortality (P < 0.05) relative to those doing neither. These results confirm the protective effects of low SF and high FV intake against CHD mortality. In addition, they extend these findings by demonstrating that the combination of both behaviors is more protective than either alone, suggesting that their beneficial effects are mediated by different mechanisms. SN - 0022-3166 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15735093/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jn/135.3.556 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -