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Short-term recurrent abdominal pain related to Helicobacter pylori infection in children.
J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2005 Mar; 20(3):395-400.JG

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIM

The causal relationship between Helicobacter pylori infection and recurrent abdominal pain in children is still under debate. This study assessed the relationship between H. pylori infection and recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) in preschool and school children.

METHODS

A total of 1271 preschool and school children completed a questionnaire to define the RAP or short-term RAP (SRAP) with pain duration from 2 weeks to 3 months. The serum samples of 118 children with RAP, 60 with SRAP and 212 control children without abdominal pain were all tested for anti-H. pylori IgG. Children with abdominal pain and anti-H. pylori seropositivity were followed for 1 year to assess the relationship of H. pylori infection and recurrent abdominal pain.

RESULTS

The prevalence rates of RAP and SRAP in children were 9.8% (124/1271) and 5.5% (70/1271), respectively. Children with SRAP had a higher anti-H. pylori seropositive rate than those with RAP (25%vs 5%, P < 0.001) and control (25%vs 9%, P = 0.001). Among children with SRAP, the epigastric pain was related to H. pylori infection (P = 0.002). One year later, 71% (15/21) of the follow-up children (15 with SRAP, six with RAP) became symptom free regardless of the persistence of H. pylori.

CONCLUSION

H. pylori infection is more commonly found in children with short-term RAP, and presentation of epigastric pain in these cases can be considered as a warning alarm to screen for H. pylori infection.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, Medical College, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15740482

Citation

Yang, Yao-Jong, et al. "Short-term Recurrent Abdominal Pain Related to Helicobacter Pylori Infection in Children." Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, vol. 20, no. 3, 2005, pp. 395-400.
Yang YJ, Sheu BS, Lee SC, et al. Short-term recurrent abdominal pain related to Helicobacter pylori infection in children. J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2005;20(3):395-400.
Yang, Y. J., Sheu, B. S., Lee, S. C., & Wu, J. J. (2005). Short-term recurrent abdominal pain related to Helicobacter pylori infection in children. Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 20(3), 395-400.
Yang YJ, et al. Short-term Recurrent Abdominal Pain Related to Helicobacter Pylori Infection in Children. J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2005;20(3):395-400. PubMed PMID: 15740482.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Short-term recurrent abdominal pain related to Helicobacter pylori infection in children. AU - Yang,Yao-Jong, AU - Sheu,Bor-Shyang, AU - Lee,Shui-Cheng, AU - Wu,Jiunn-Jong, PY - 2005/3/3/pubmed PY - 2005/7/1/medline PY - 2005/3/3/entrez SP - 395 EP - 400 JF - Journal of gastroenterology and hepatology JO - J Gastroenterol Hepatol VL - 20 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND AND AIM: The causal relationship between Helicobacter pylori infection and recurrent abdominal pain in children is still under debate. This study assessed the relationship between H. pylori infection and recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) in preschool and school children. METHODS: A total of 1271 preschool and school children completed a questionnaire to define the RAP or short-term RAP (SRAP) with pain duration from 2 weeks to 3 months. The serum samples of 118 children with RAP, 60 with SRAP and 212 control children without abdominal pain were all tested for anti-H. pylori IgG. Children with abdominal pain and anti-H. pylori seropositivity were followed for 1 year to assess the relationship of H. pylori infection and recurrent abdominal pain. RESULTS: The prevalence rates of RAP and SRAP in children were 9.8% (124/1271) and 5.5% (70/1271), respectively. Children with SRAP had a higher anti-H. pylori seropositive rate than those with RAP (25%vs 5%, P < 0.001) and control (25%vs 9%, P = 0.001). Among children with SRAP, the epigastric pain was related to H. pylori infection (P = 0.002). One year later, 71% (15/21) of the follow-up children (15 with SRAP, six with RAP) became symptom free regardless of the persistence of H. pylori. CONCLUSION: H. pylori infection is more commonly found in children with short-term RAP, and presentation of epigastric pain in these cases can be considered as a warning alarm to screen for H. pylori infection. SN - 0815-9319 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15740482/Short_term_recurrent_abdominal_pain_related_to_Helicobacter_pylori_infection_in_children_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1440-1746.2005.03578.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -