Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

A randomised controlled trial in the north of England examining the effects of skin-to-skin care on breast feeding.
Midwifery. 2005 Mar; 21(1):71-9.M

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

to examine the effect of early skin-to-skin contact between mothers and their healthy full-term babies on initiation and duration of breast feeding.

DESIGN

a randomised controlled trial comparing skin-to-skin with routine care.

SETTING

Warrington Hospital, Cheshire, UK.

PARTICIPANTS

204 mother and baby pairs; 102 randomised to each group.

OUTCOME MEASURES

success of first breast feed, maternal satisfaction with skin-to-skin care and preference for future post-delivery care, baby-body temperature 1 hr after birth, partial or exclusive breast feeding at 4 months.

FINDINGS

in the skin-to-skin group, 89 out of 98 (91%) babies had a successful first feed compared with 82 out of 89 (83%) in the routine care group. The difference in the success rate was 8%, 95% confidence interval (CI) (-1.6%, 17.6%); chi(2)=2.7; df=1; P=0.10. Forty-two out of 97 (43%) babies given skin-to-skin were partially or exclusively breast feeding at 4 months compared with 40 out of 100 (40%) of babies in the routine care group. The difference in breast-feeding rate at 4 months was 3.3%, 95% CI (-10.3%, 16.7%); chi(2)=0.22; df=1; P=0.64. The mean temperature 1 hr after birth was higher with skin-to-skin than routine care. The difference in means was 0.15 degrees C; 95% CI (0.03, 0.28); P=0.02. A larger proportion of mothers (87/97 [90%]) were very satisfied with skin-to-skin care, compared with 60 out of 102 (59%) in the control group; 83 out of 97 (86%) of the mothers in the intervention group said that they would prefer to receive the same care in the future compared with 31 out of 102 (30%) mothers in the control group.

CONCLUSIONS

the difference between the groups in the success rate for the first breast feed and rates at 4 months was not statistically significant. However, mothers who had skin-to-skin contact enjoyed the experience, and most reported that they would choose to have skin-to skin care in the future. In this, the largest trial to date, previous concerns about baby-body temperature after skin-to-skin care were dispelled.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Women's Health Directorate, North Cheshire Hospitals NHS Trust, Warrington, UK. suecarfoot@blueyonder.co.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15740818

Citation

Carfoot, Sue, et al. "A Randomised Controlled Trial in the North of England Examining the Effects of Skin-to-skin Care On Breast Feeding." Midwifery, vol. 21, no. 1, 2005, pp. 71-9.
Carfoot S, Williamson P, Dickson R. A randomised controlled trial in the north of England examining the effects of skin-to-skin care on breast feeding. Midwifery. 2005;21(1):71-9.
Carfoot, S., Williamson, P., & Dickson, R. (2005). A randomised controlled trial in the north of England examining the effects of skin-to-skin care on breast feeding. Midwifery, 21(1), 71-9.
Carfoot S, Williamson P, Dickson R. A Randomised Controlled Trial in the North of England Examining the Effects of Skin-to-skin Care On Breast Feeding. Midwifery. 2005;21(1):71-9. PubMed PMID: 15740818.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A randomised controlled trial in the north of England examining the effects of skin-to-skin care on breast feeding. AU - Carfoot,Sue, AU - Williamson,Paula, AU - Dickson,Rumona, PY - 2004/02/11/received PY - 2004/09/08/revised PY - 2004/09/15/accepted PY - 2005/3/3/pubmed PY - 2005/6/21/medline PY - 2005/3/3/entrez SP - 71 EP - 9 JF - Midwifery JO - Midwifery VL - 21 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: to examine the effect of early skin-to-skin contact between mothers and their healthy full-term babies on initiation and duration of breast feeding. DESIGN: a randomised controlled trial comparing skin-to-skin with routine care. SETTING: Warrington Hospital, Cheshire, UK. PARTICIPANTS: 204 mother and baby pairs; 102 randomised to each group. OUTCOME MEASURES: success of first breast feed, maternal satisfaction with skin-to-skin care and preference for future post-delivery care, baby-body temperature 1 hr after birth, partial or exclusive breast feeding at 4 months. FINDINGS: in the skin-to-skin group, 89 out of 98 (91%) babies had a successful first feed compared with 82 out of 89 (83%) in the routine care group. The difference in the success rate was 8%, 95% confidence interval (CI) (-1.6%, 17.6%); chi(2)=2.7; df=1; P=0.10. Forty-two out of 97 (43%) babies given skin-to-skin were partially or exclusively breast feeding at 4 months compared with 40 out of 100 (40%) of babies in the routine care group. The difference in breast-feeding rate at 4 months was 3.3%, 95% CI (-10.3%, 16.7%); chi(2)=0.22; df=1; P=0.64. The mean temperature 1 hr after birth was higher with skin-to-skin than routine care. The difference in means was 0.15 degrees C; 95% CI (0.03, 0.28); P=0.02. A larger proportion of mothers (87/97 [90%]) were very satisfied with skin-to-skin care, compared with 60 out of 102 (59%) in the control group; 83 out of 97 (86%) of the mothers in the intervention group said that they would prefer to receive the same care in the future compared with 31 out of 102 (30%) mothers in the control group. CONCLUSIONS: the difference between the groups in the success rate for the first breast feed and rates at 4 months was not statistically significant. However, mothers who had skin-to-skin contact enjoyed the experience, and most reported that they would choose to have skin-to skin care in the future. In this, the largest trial to date, previous concerns about baby-body temperature after skin-to-skin care were dispelled. SN - 0266-6138 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15740818/A_randomised_controlled_trial_in_the_north_of_England_examining_the_effects_of_skin_to_skin_care_on_breast_feeding_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0266-6138(04)00076-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -