Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Impact of core and secondary foods on nutritional composition of diets in Native-American women.
J Am Diet Assoc. 2005 Mar; 105(3):413-9.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To identify the core and secondary foods among Native-American women in Oklahoma and to determine their impact on nutrient and Food Guide Pyramid serving intakes.

DESIGN

This descriptive study explored food intakes from 4-day weighed food records. Nutrient intakes were estimated using reference data used in national survey data.

SUBJECTS/SETTING

Seventy-one Native-American women receiving services from three tribal health clinics in northeast Oklahoma. Statistical analyses performed A food-use frequency score was computed using frequencies of individuals consuming foods across each of 4 days of records. Leading contributors of nutrients and Food Guide Pyramid servings were identified from core and secondary foods.

RESULTS

Thirty foods comprised the list of core foods, led by soda, coffee, and white bread. A majority of total energy, fat, saturated fat, monounsaturated fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids, cholesterol, carbohydrate, calcium, vitamin C, folate, discretionary fat, and added sugar were derived cumulatively from the core and secondary foods. Forty percent of fruit Food Guide Pyramid servings were accounted for by two core foods, bananas, and orange juice. More than half of meat and vegetable Food Guide Pyramid servings were derived from core and secondary foods.

CONCLUSIONS

Food patterning data are helpful in the development of effective nutrition education programs. We identified less nutrient-dense core foods that are contributing to discretionary fat and added sugar intakes. Targeted nutrition education programs for Native Americans should promote the nutrient-dense core and secondary foods, such as whole-wheat bread and fruit, while providing more healthful food alternatives to less nutrient-dense foods.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutritional Sciences, Oklahoma State University, USA. ctaylor@amp.osu.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15746830

Citation

Taylor, Christopher A., et al. "Impact of Core and Secondary Foods On Nutritional Composition of Diets in Native-American Women." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 105, no. 3, 2005, pp. 413-9.
Taylor CA, Keim KS, Gilmore AC. Impact of core and secondary foods on nutritional composition of diets in Native-American women. J Am Diet Assoc. 2005;105(3):413-9.
Taylor, C. A., Keim, K. S., & Gilmore, A. C. (2005). Impact of core and secondary foods on nutritional composition of diets in Native-American women. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 105(3), 413-9.
Taylor CA, Keim KS, Gilmore AC. Impact of Core and Secondary Foods On Nutritional Composition of Diets in Native-American Women. J Am Diet Assoc. 2005;105(3):413-9. PubMed PMID: 15746830.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Impact of core and secondary foods on nutritional composition of diets in Native-American women. AU - Taylor,Christopher A, AU - Keim,Kathryn S, AU - Gilmore,Alicia C, PY - 2005/3/5/pubmed PY - 2005/4/13/medline PY - 2005/3/5/entrez SP - 413 EP - 9 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 105 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To identify the core and secondary foods among Native-American women in Oklahoma and to determine their impact on nutrient and Food Guide Pyramid serving intakes. DESIGN: This descriptive study explored food intakes from 4-day weighed food records. Nutrient intakes were estimated using reference data used in national survey data. SUBJECTS/SETTING: Seventy-one Native-American women receiving services from three tribal health clinics in northeast Oklahoma. Statistical analyses performed A food-use frequency score was computed using frequencies of individuals consuming foods across each of 4 days of records. Leading contributors of nutrients and Food Guide Pyramid servings were identified from core and secondary foods. RESULTS: Thirty foods comprised the list of core foods, led by soda, coffee, and white bread. A majority of total energy, fat, saturated fat, monounsaturated fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids, cholesterol, carbohydrate, calcium, vitamin C, folate, discretionary fat, and added sugar were derived cumulatively from the core and secondary foods. Forty percent of fruit Food Guide Pyramid servings were accounted for by two core foods, bananas, and orange juice. More than half of meat and vegetable Food Guide Pyramid servings were derived from core and secondary foods. CONCLUSIONS: Food patterning data are helpful in the development of effective nutrition education programs. We identified less nutrient-dense core foods that are contributing to discretionary fat and added sugar intakes. Targeted nutrition education programs for Native Americans should promote the nutrient-dense core and secondary foods, such as whole-wheat bread and fruit, while providing more healthful food alternatives to less nutrient-dense foods. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15746830/Impact_of_core_and_secondary_foods_on_nutritional_composition_of_diets_in_Native_American_women_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002822304018437 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -