Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Smoking and the risk of suicidal behavior: a prospective study of a community sample.
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2005 Mar; 62(3):328-34.AG

Abstract

BACKGROUND

A link between cigarette smoking and suicidal behavior has been reported in clinical and epidemiological studies.

OBJECTIVE

To examine the association between smoking and suicidal thoughts or attempt in a longitudinal study, in which proximate status of smoking and psychiatric disorders in relation to timing of suicidal behaviors is taken into account.

DESIGN

A longitudinal study of young adults interviewed initially in 1989, with repeated assessments over a 10-year follow-up.

SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS

The sample was selected from a large health maintenance organization representing the geographic area, except for the extremes of the socioeconomic range. The response rate at each follow-up (3, 5, and 10 years after baseline) exceeded 91%.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Relative risk of occurrence of suicidal behaviors during follow-up intervals by status of smoking and psychiatric disorders at the start of the interval, estimated by generalized estimating equations with repeated measures. The National Institute of Mental Health Diagnostic Interview Schedule was used at baseline and at each reassessment.

RESULTS

Current daily smoking, but not past smoking, predicted the subsequent occurrence of suicidal thoughts or attempt, independent of prior depression and substance use disorders (adjusted odds ratio, 1.82; 95% confidence interval, 1.22-2.69). Additionally, current daily smoking, but not past smoking, predicted the subsequent occurrence of suicidal thoughts or attempt, adjusting for suicidal predisposition, indicated by prior suicidality, and controlling for prior psychiatric disorders (adjusted odds ratio, 1.74; 95% confidence interval, 1.17-2.54).

CONCLUSIONS

The biological explanation of the finding that current smoking is associated with subsequent suicidal behavior is unclear. Recent observations of lower monoamine oxidase activity (which may play a role in central nervous system serotonin metabolism) in current smokers but not ex-smokers might provide clues, but interpretations should proceed cautiously.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology and Office of the Dean, College of Human Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15753246

Citation

Breslau, Naomi, et al. "Smoking and the Risk of Suicidal Behavior: a Prospective Study of a Community Sample." Archives of General Psychiatry, vol. 62, no. 3, 2005, pp. 328-34.
Breslau N, Schultz LR, Johnson EO, et al. Smoking and the risk of suicidal behavior: a prospective study of a community sample. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2005;62(3):328-34.
Breslau, N., Schultz, L. R., Johnson, E. O., Peterson, E. L., & Davis, G. C. (2005). Smoking and the risk of suicidal behavior: a prospective study of a community sample. Archives of General Psychiatry, 62(3), 328-34.
Breslau N, et al. Smoking and the Risk of Suicidal Behavior: a Prospective Study of a Community Sample. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2005;62(3):328-34. PubMed PMID: 15753246.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Smoking and the risk of suicidal behavior: a prospective study of a community sample. AU - Breslau,Naomi, AU - Schultz,Lonni R, AU - Johnson,Eric O, AU - Peterson,Edward L, AU - Davis,Glenn C, PY - 2005/3/9/pubmed PY - 2005/3/22/medline PY - 2005/3/9/entrez SP - 328 EP - 34 JF - Archives of general psychiatry JO - Arch Gen Psychiatry VL - 62 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: A link between cigarette smoking and suicidal behavior has been reported in clinical and epidemiological studies. OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between smoking and suicidal thoughts or attempt in a longitudinal study, in which proximate status of smoking and psychiatric disorders in relation to timing of suicidal behaviors is taken into account. DESIGN: A longitudinal study of young adults interviewed initially in 1989, with repeated assessments over a 10-year follow-up. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: The sample was selected from a large health maintenance organization representing the geographic area, except for the extremes of the socioeconomic range. The response rate at each follow-up (3, 5, and 10 years after baseline) exceeded 91%. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Relative risk of occurrence of suicidal behaviors during follow-up intervals by status of smoking and psychiatric disorders at the start of the interval, estimated by generalized estimating equations with repeated measures. The National Institute of Mental Health Diagnostic Interview Schedule was used at baseline and at each reassessment. RESULTS: Current daily smoking, but not past smoking, predicted the subsequent occurrence of suicidal thoughts or attempt, independent of prior depression and substance use disorders (adjusted odds ratio, 1.82; 95% confidence interval, 1.22-2.69). Additionally, current daily smoking, but not past smoking, predicted the subsequent occurrence of suicidal thoughts or attempt, adjusting for suicidal predisposition, indicated by prior suicidality, and controlling for prior psychiatric disorders (adjusted odds ratio, 1.74; 95% confidence interval, 1.17-2.54). CONCLUSIONS: The biological explanation of the finding that current smoking is associated with subsequent suicidal behavior is unclear. Recent observations of lower monoamine oxidase activity (which may play a role in central nervous system serotonin metabolism) in current smokers but not ex-smokers might provide clues, but interpretations should proceed cautiously. SN - 0003-990X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15753246/Smoking_and_the_risk_of_suicidal_behavior:_a_prospective_study_of_a_community_sample_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapsychiatry/fullarticle/10.1001/archpsyc.62.3.328 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -