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Racial disparities in the optimal delivery of chronic kidney disease care.
Med Clin North Am. 2005 May; 89(3):475-88.MC

Abstract

This article provides evidence that the current and growing burden of CKD in racial and ethnic minority populations is likely to be multifactorial involving the interplay of biologic, clinical, social, and behavioral determinants. To eliminate these disparities, crafting successful solutions requires more attention to the constellation of contributing factors not only by specialists, primary care physicians, and other health care providers involved in CKD care, but also clinical and behavioral scientists, payers of health care, and patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, 2024 East Monument Street, Suite 2-600, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. npowe@jhmi.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15755463

Citation

Powe, Neil R., and Michal L. Melamed. "Racial Disparities in the Optimal Delivery of Chronic Kidney Disease Care." The Medical Clinics of North America, vol. 89, no. 3, 2005, pp. 475-88.
Powe NR, Melamed ML. Racial disparities in the optimal delivery of chronic kidney disease care. Med Clin North Am. 2005;89(3):475-88.
Powe, N. R., & Melamed, M. L. (2005). Racial disparities in the optimal delivery of chronic kidney disease care. The Medical Clinics of North America, 89(3), 475-88.
Powe NR, Melamed ML. Racial Disparities in the Optimal Delivery of Chronic Kidney Disease Care. Med Clin North Am. 2005;89(3):475-88. PubMed PMID: 15755463.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Racial disparities in the optimal delivery of chronic kidney disease care. AU - Powe,Neil R, AU - Melamed,Michal L, PY - 2005/3/10/pubmed PY - 2005/6/17/medline PY - 2005/3/10/entrez SP - 475 EP - 88 JF - The Medical clinics of North America JO - Med Clin North Am VL - 89 IS - 3 N2 - This article provides evidence that the current and growing burden of CKD in racial and ethnic minority populations is likely to be multifactorial involving the interplay of biologic, clinical, social, and behavioral determinants. To eliminate these disparities, crafting successful solutions requires more attention to the constellation of contributing factors not only by specialists, primary care physicians, and other health care providers involved in CKD care, but also clinical and behavioral scientists, payers of health care, and patients. SN - 0025-7125 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15755463/Racial_disparities_in_the_optimal_delivery_of_chronic_kidney_disease_care_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0025-7125(04)00180-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -