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Substance abuse treatment and hospitalization among a cohort of HIV-infected individuals with alcohol problems.
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2005 Mar; 29(3):389-94.AC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

We examined the association of substance abuse treatment services on hospitalization among participants in the HIV-Alcohol Longitudinal Cohort (HIV-ALC) study of HIV-infected individuals with a history of alcohol problems.

METHODS

A standardized questionnaire that inquired about demographics, substance use, use of substance abuse treatment services, and hospitalization was administered to 349 HIV-ALC participants. We defined substance abuse treatment services as any of the following in the past 6 months: 12 weeks in a half-way house or residential facility, 12 visits to a substance abuse counselor or mental health professional, or participation in any methadone maintenance program.

RESULTS

Almost one third of this cohort were hospitalized in the past 6 months. Substance abuse treatment was not significantly associated with hospitalization [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 1.0; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.7-1.5), whereas homelessness (AOR 2.3; 95% CI 1.5-3.6), injection drug use (AOR 1.7; 95% CI 1.0-2.7), severity of alcohol dependence (AOR 1.02; 95% CI 1.00-1.05), CD4 cell count (AOR 0.999; 95% CI 0.998-1.00), and HIV RNA (AOR 1.1; 95% CI 1.0-1.2) were independently associated with increased odds of hospitalization over time.

CONCLUSIONS

Engagement in substance abuse treatment was not associated with a decrease in hospital use by HIV-infected individuals with a history of alcohol problems. The period of substance abuse treatment may present an opportunity to address health care utilization patterns of HIV-infected individuals.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Health Evaluation and Outcome Sciences, St. Paul's Hospital, Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. anita@hivnet.ubc.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15770114

Citation

Palepu, Anita, et al. "Substance Abuse Treatment and Hospitalization Among a Cohort of HIV-infected Individuals With Alcohol Problems." Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, vol. 29, no. 3, 2005, pp. 389-94.
Palepu A, Horton NJ, Tibbetts N, et al. Substance abuse treatment and hospitalization among a cohort of HIV-infected individuals with alcohol problems. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2005;29(3):389-94.
Palepu, A., Horton, N. J., Tibbetts, N., Meli, S., & Samet, J. H. (2005). Substance abuse treatment and hospitalization among a cohort of HIV-infected individuals with alcohol problems. Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, 29(3), 389-94.
Palepu A, et al. Substance Abuse Treatment and Hospitalization Among a Cohort of HIV-infected Individuals With Alcohol Problems. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2005;29(3):389-94. PubMed PMID: 15770114.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Substance abuse treatment and hospitalization among a cohort of HIV-infected individuals with alcohol problems. AU - Palepu,Anita, AU - Horton,Nicholas J, AU - Tibbetts,Nicole, AU - Meli,Seville, AU - Samet,Jeffrey H, PY - 2005/3/17/pubmed PY - 2005/6/28/medline PY - 2005/3/17/entrez SP - 389 EP - 94 JF - Alcoholism, clinical and experimental research JO - Alcohol Clin Exp Res VL - 29 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: We examined the association of substance abuse treatment services on hospitalization among participants in the HIV-Alcohol Longitudinal Cohort (HIV-ALC) study of HIV-infected individuals with a history of alcohol problems. METHODS: A standardized questionnaire that inquired about demographics, substance use, use of substance abuse treatment services, and hospitalization was administered to 349 HIV-ALC participants. We defined substance abuse treatment services as any of the following in the past 6 months: 12 weeks in a half-way house or residential facility, 12 visits to a substance abuse counselor or mental health professional, or participation in any methadone maintenance program. RESULTS: Almost one third of this cohort were hospitalized in the past 6 months. Substance abuse treatment was not significantly associated with hospitalization [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 1.0; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.7-1.5), whereas homelessness (AOR 2.3; 95% CI 1.5-3.6), injection drug use (AOR 1.7; 95% CI 1.0-2.7), severity of alcohol dependence (AOR 1.02; 95% CI 1.00-1.05), CD4 cell count (AOR 0.999; 95% CI 0.998-1.00), and HIV RNA (AOR 1.1; 95% CI 1.0-1.2) were independently associated with increased odds of hospitalization over time. CONCLUSIONS: Engagement in substance abuse treatment was not associated with a decrease in hospital use by HIV-infected individuals with a history of alcohol problems. The period of substance abuse treatment may present an opportunity to address health care utilization patterns of HIV-infected individuals. SN - 0145-6008 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15770114/Substance_abuse_treatment_and_hospitalization_among_a_cohort_of_HIV_infected_individuals_with_alcohol_problems_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0145-6008&date=2005&volume=29&issue=3&spage=389 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -