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Epidural ropivacaine 1% with and without sufentanil addition for Caesarean section.
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2005 Apr; 49(4):525-31.AA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

So far only ropivacaine concentrations of 0.5 and 0.75% have been used for Caesarean section. This prospective double-blind trial evaluated the anaesthetic quality of ropivacaine 1% with and without sufentanil addition.

METHODS

Three groups of patients (n=20 each) scheduled for an elective Caesarean section were studied. The patients received initially 120 mg ropivacaine, or 120 mg ropivacaine plus 10 microg or 20 microg sufentanil. Additional epidural ropivacaine was injected if necessary. Primary outcome parameter was time to achieve sensory block at T4. Moreover, pain intensity at delivery (visual analogue scale, VAS), incidence of maternal side-effects (hypotension, bradycardia, nausea, vomiting, shivering, pruritus), and neonatal outcome (Apgar score, neurologic and adaptive capacity score, umbilical cord blood-gas values) were recorded.

RESULTS

The onset time for the sensory block was not significantly different among the groups. Also, VAS scores at delivery did not differ significantly between the plain ropivacaine 1% group (18 +/- 29 mm), the 10-microg sufentanil group (1 +/- 5 mm), and the 20-microg sufentanil group (6 +/- 18 mm). The total dose of ropivacaine was significantly higher in the plain ropivacaine 1% group (145 +/- 19 mg) compared to the patients receiving additional 10 microg sufentanil (130 +/- 15 mg, P = 0.02) or 20 microg sufentanil (129 +/- 16 mg, P = 0.01). The incidence of maternal side-effects and neonatal outcome were similar in all groups.

CONCLUSION

Ropivacaine 1% alone provided sufficient analgesia. Sufentanil addition did not significantly improve the quality of epidural anaesthesia with ropivacaine 1.0% for Caesarean section.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Anaesthesiology, Klinikum Minden, Minden, Germany. b.bachmann-m@klinikum-minden.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15777301

Citation

Bachmann-Mennenga, B, et al. "Epidural Ropivacaine 1% With and Without Sufentanil Addition for Caesarean Section." Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, vol. 49, no. 4, 2005, pp. 525-31.
Bachmann-Mennenga B, Veit G, Biscoping J, et al. Epidural ropivacaine 1% with and without sufentanil addition for Caesarean section. Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2005;49(4):525-31.
Bachmann-Mennenga, B., Veit, G., Biscoping, J., Steinicke, B., & Heesen, M. (2005). Epidural ropivacaine 1% with and without sufentanil addition for Caesarean section. Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, 49(4), 525-31.
Bachmann-Mennenga B, et al. Epidural Ropivacaine 1% With and Without Sufentanil Addition for Caesarean Section. Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2005;49(4):525-31. PubMed PMID: 15777301.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Epidural ropivacaine 1% with and without sufentanil addition for Caesarean section. AU - Bachmann-Mennenga,B, AU - Veit,G, AU - Biscoping,J, AU - Steinicke,B, AU - Heesen,M, PY - 2005/3/22/pubmed PY - 2005/6/25/medline PY - 2005/3/22/entrez SP - 525 EP - 31 JF - Acta anaesthesiologica Scandinavica JO - Acta Anaesthesiol Scand VL - 49 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: So far only ropivacaine concentrations of 0.5 and 0.75% have been used for Caesarean section. This prospective double-blind trial evaluated the anaesthetic quality of ropivacaine 1% with and without sufentanil addition. METHODS: Three groups of patients (n=20 each) scheduled for an elective Caesarean section were studied. The patients received initially 120 mg ropivacaine, or 120 mg ropivacaine plus 10 microg or 20 microg sufentanil. Additional epidural ropivacaine was injected if necessary. Primary outcome parameter was time to achieve sensory block at T4. Moreover, pain intensity at delivery (visual analogue scale, VAS), incidence of maternal side-effects (hypotension, bradycardia, nausea, vomiting, shivering, pruritus), and neonatal outcome (Apgar score, neurologic and adaptive capacity score, umbilical cord blood-gas values) were recorded. RESULTS: The onset time for the sensory block was not significantly different among the groups. Also, VAS scores at delivery did not differ significantly between the plain ropivacaine 1% group (18 +/- 29 mm), the 10-microg sufentanil group (1 +/- 5 mm), and the 20-microg sufentanil group (6 +/- 18 mm). The total dose of ropivacaine was significantly higher in the plain ropivacaine 1% group (145 +/- 19 mg) compared to the patients receiving additional 10 microg sufentanil (130 +/- 15 mg, P = 0.02) or 20 microg sufentanil (129 +/- 16 mg, P = 0.01). The incidence of maternal side-effects and neonatal outcome were similar in all groups. CONCLUSION: Ropivacaine 1% alone provided sufficient analgesia. Sufentanil addition did not significantly improve the quality of epidural anaesthesia with ropivacaine 1.0% for Caesarean section. SN - 0001-5172 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15777301/Epidural_ropivacaine_1_with_and_without_sufentanil_addition_for_Caesarean_section_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1399-6576.2004.00580.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -