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Weight and behavioral and psychosocial factors among ethnically diverse, low-income women after childbirth: I. Methods and context.
Women Health 2004; 40(2):1-17WH

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

In this paper, we present the background, hypotheses, methods, and descriptive findings from the Austin New Mothers Study, a longitudinal series measuring weight and contextual variables across the first postpartum year. Among the distinguishing features of this study are its tri-ethnic sample of low-income women and its serial measurement of the behavioral and psychosocial context of postpartum weight changes post-delivery and at 6 weeks, and 3, 6, and 12 months postpartum.

METHOD

A prospective longitudinal design was used to assess body mass index (BMI), energy intake, fat intake, physical activity, health-related lifestyle, depressive symptoms, body image, and weight-related distress at each observation.

SAMPLE

The analytic sample consisted of 382 White, African American, and Hispanic women.

FINDINGS

For BMI, effects for ethnicity (p < .001), time (p < .001), and their interaction (p = .005) were significant. All ethnic groups had significant declines in BMI from delivery to 6 weeks postpartum. Thereafter, BMIs of White women declined during the second 6 months, whereas those of Hispanic and African American women either displayed small gains or plateaus between adjacent observations. Time-related effects were significant for behavioral and psychosocial variables except for body image and weight-related distress, whereas effects for ethnicity were significant on fat intake, depressive symptoms, and body image. Despite declines in depressive symptoms, women remained at risk of depression across the first postpartum year.

CONCLUSIONS

Low-income ethnic minority women have a higher vulnerability to postpartum weight gains or plateaus. High depressive symptoms occurred in all ethnic groups examined.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Texas at Austin, School of Nursing, 1700 River Street, Austin, TX 78701-1499, USA. lwalker-admin@mail.nur.utexas.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15778135

Citation

Walker, Lorraine O., et al. "Weight and Behavioral and Psychosocial Factors Among Ethnically Diverse, Low-income Women After Childbirth: I. Methods and Context." Women & Health, vol. 40, no. 2, 2004, pp. 1-17.
Walker LO, Freeland-Graves JH, Milani T, et al. Weight and behavioral and psychosocial factors among ethnically diverse, low-income women after childbirth: I. Methods and context. Women Health. 2004;40(2):1-17.
Walker, L. O., Freeland-Graves, J. H., Milani, T., Hanss-Nuss, H., George, G., Sterling, B. S., ... Stuifbergen, A. (2004). Weight and behavioral and psychosocial factors among ethnically diverse, low-income women after childbirth: I. Methods and context. Women & Health, 40(2), pp. 1-17.
Walker LO, et al. Weight and Behavioral and Psychosocial Factors Among Ethnically Diverse, Low-income Women After Childbirth: I. Methods and Context. Women Health. 2004;40(2):1-17. PubMed PMID: 15778135.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Weight and behavioral and psychosocial factors among ethnically diverse, low-income women after childbirth: I. Methods and context. AU - Walker,Lorraine O, AU - Freeland-Graves,Jeanne H, AU - Milani,Tracey, AU - Hanss-Nuss,Henry, AU - George,Goldy, AU - Sterling,Bobbie Sue, AU - Kim,Minseong, AU - Timmerman,Gayle M, AU - Wilkinson,Susan, AU - Arheart,Kristopher L, AU - Stuifbergen,Alexa, PY - 2005/3/22/pubmed PY - 2005/4/6/medline PY - 2005/3/22/entrez SP - 1 EP - 17 JF - Women & health JO - Women Health VL - 40 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: In this paper, we present the background, hypotheses, methods, and descriptive findings from the Austin New Mothers Study, a longitudinal series measuring weight and contextual variables across the first postpartum year. Among the distinguishing features of this study are its tri-ethnic sample of low-income women and its serial measurement of the behavioral and psychosocial context of postpartum weight changes post-delivery and at 6 weeks, and 3, 6, and 12 months postpartum. METHOD: A prospective longitudinal design was used to assess body mass index (BMI), energy intake, fat intake, physical activity, health-related lifestyle, depressive symptoms, body image, and weight-related distress at each observation. SAMPLE: The analytic sample consisted of 382 White, African American, and Hispanic women. FINDINGS: For BMI, effects for ethnicity (p < .001), time (p < .001), and their interaction (p = .005) were significant. All ethnic groups had significant declines in BMI from delivery to 6 weeks postpartum. Thereafter, BMIs of White women declined during the second 6 months, whereas those of Hispanic and African American women either displayed small gains or plateaus between adjacent observations. Time-related effects were significant for behavioral and psychosocial variables except for body image and weight-related distress, whereas effects for ethnicity were significant on fat intake, depressive symptoms, and body image. Despite declines in depressive symptoms, women remained at risk of depression across the first postpartum year. CONCLUSIONS: Low-income ethnic minority women have a higher vulnerability to postpartum weight gains or plateaus. High depressive symptoms occurred in all ethnic groups examined. SN - 0363-0242 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15778135/Weight_and_behavioral_and_psychosocial_factors_among_ethnically_diverse_low_income_women_after_childbirth:_I__Methods_and_context_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1300/J013v40n02_01 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -