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Cigarette smoking and completed suicide among middle-aged men: a population-based cohort study in Japan.
Ann Epidemiol. 2005 Apr; 15(4):286-92.AE

Abstract

PURPOSE

To clarify whether cigarette smoking was associated with completed suicide in a cohort of middle-aged Japanese men.

METHODS

A total of 45,209 out of 57,714 men, aged 40 to 69 years, in nine public health centers across Japan responded to a self-administered questionnaire that included questions regarding their smoking history. The questionnaire was distributed in 1990 (Cohort I) and in 1993 and 1994 (Cohort II). By the end of 2000, 173 suicides were identified by death certificates.

RESULTS

After adjusting for potential confounders, current smokers had a marginally higher risk of suicide than never smokers. Current smokers with more than 60 pack-years of cigarette smoking had a more than two-fold higher risk of suicide than never smokers (pooled multivariate relative risk=2.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.1, 4.0), but a significant dose-response relationship between pack-years of smoking and suicide was not found. The risk of suicide increased significantly with increasing numbers of cigarettes smoked per day (p for trend=0.036). Smoking status, duration of quitting, duration of smoking, and age at the start of smoking were not significantly associated with suicide risk.

CONCLUSION

Our results suggest that heavy smoking, particularly a large number of cigarettes per day at baseline was associated with an increased risk of suicide independent of several potential confounders.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Epidemiology and Prevention Division, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, Tokyo, Japan. moiwasak@gan2.res.ncc.go.jpNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15780776

Citation

Iwasaki, Motoki, et al. "Cigarette Smoking and Completed Suicide Among Middle-aged Men: a Population-based Cohort Study in Japan." Annals of Epidemiology, vol. 15, no. 4, 2005, pp. 286-92.
Iwasaki M, Akechi T, Uchitomi Y, et al. Cigarette smoking and completed suicide among middle-aged men: a population-based cohort study in Japan. Ann Epidemiol. 2005;15(4):286-92.
Iwasaki, M., Akechi, T., Uchitomi, Y., & Tsugane, S. (2005). Cigarette smoking and completed suicide among middle-aged men: a population-based cohort study in Japan. Annals of Epidemiology, 15(4), 286-92.
Iwasaki M, et al. Cigarette Smoking and Completed Suicide Among Middle-aged Men: a Population-based Cohort Study in Japan. Ann Epidemiol. 2005;15(4):286-92. PubMed PMID: 15780776.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cigarette smoking and completed suicide among middle-aged men: a population-based cohort study in Japan. AU - Iwasaki,Motoki, AU - Akechi,Tatsuo, AU - Uchitomi,Yosuke, AU - Tsugane,Shoichiro, AU - ,, PY - 2004/02/09/received PY - 2004/08/13/accepted PY - 2005/3/23/pubmed PY - 2005/7/6/medline PY - 2005/3/23/entrez SP - 286 EP - 92 JF - Annals of epidemiology JO - Ann Epidemiol VL - 15 IS - 4 N2 - PURPOSE: To clarify whether cigarette smoking was associated with completed suicide in a cohort of middle-aged Japanese men. METHODS: A total of 45,209 out of 57,714 men, aged 40 to 69 years, in nine public health centers across Japan responded to a self-administered questionnaire that included questions regarding their smoking history. The questionnaire was distributed in 1990 (Cohort I) and in 1993 and 1994 (Cohort II). By the end of 2000, 173 suicides were identified by death certificates. RESULTS: After adjusting for potential confounders, current smokers had a marginally higher risk of suicide than never smokers. Current smokers with more than 60 pack-years of cigarette smoking had a more than two-fold higher risk of suicide than never smokers (pooled multivariate relative risk=2.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.1, 4.0), but a significant dose-response relationship between pack-years of smoking and suicide was not found. The risk of suicide increased significantly with increasing numbers of cigarettes smoked per day (p for trend=0.036). Smoking status, duration of quitting, duration of smoking, and age at the start of smoking were not significantly associated with suicide risk. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that heavy smoking, particularly a large number of cigarettes per day at baseline was associated with an increased risk of suicide independent of several potential confounders. SN - 1047-2797 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15780776/Cigarette_smoking_and_completed_suicide_among_middle_aged_men:_a_population_based_cohort_study_in_Japan_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1047-2797(04)00275-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -