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Effect of ice surface size on collision rates and head impacts at the World Junior Hockey Championships, 2002 to 2004.
Clin J Sport Med 2005; 15(2):67-72CJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine if collision rates and head impacts in elite junior hockey differed between games played on the small North American ice surface (85 ft wide), an intermediate-size Finnish ice surface (94 ft wide), and the large standard international ice surface (100 ft wide).

DESIGN

Videotape analysis of all games involving Team Canada from the 2002 (large ice, Czech Republic), 2003 (small ice, Canada), and 2004 (intermediate ice, Finland) World Junior Championships. All collisions were counted and separated into various categories (volitional player/player bodychecks, into boards or open ice, plus accidental/incidental player/boards, player/ice, head/stick, head/puck). Further subdivisions included collisions involving the head directly or indirectly and notably severe head impacts.

RESULTS

Small, intermediate, and large ice surface mean collisions/game, respectively, were 295, 258, 222, total collisions; 251, 220, 181, volitional bodychecks; 126, 115, 88, into boards; 125, 106, 93, open ice; 71, 52, 44, total head; 44, 36, 30, indirect head; 26, 16, 13, direct head; and 1.3, 0.5, 0.3, severe head (P < 0.05 for small-intermediate ice and intermediate-large ice differences in total collisions; P < 0.005 for small-large ice difference; P < 0.05 for small-intermediate ice differences in head impacts; P < 0.01 for small-large ice differences in total and severe head impacts).

CONCLUSIONS

There is a significant inverse correlation between ice size and collision rates in elite hockey, including direct, indirect, and severe head impacts. These findings suggest that uniform usage of the larger international rinks could reduce the risk of injury, and specifically, concussions in elite hockey by decreasing the occurrence of collisions and head impacts.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Neurology and Krembil Neuroscience Centre, Toronto Western Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. r.wennberg@utoronto.ca

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15782049

Citation

Wennberg, Richard. "Effect of Ice Surface Size On Collision Rates and Head Impacts at the World Junior Hockey Championships, 2002 to 2004." Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine : Official Journal of the Canadian Academy of Sport Medicine, vol. 15, no. 2, 2005, pp. 67-72.
Wennberg R. Effect of ice surface size on collision rates and head impacts at the World Junior Hockey Championships, 2002 to 2004. Clin J Sport Med. 2005;15(2):67-72.
Wennberg, R. (2005). Effect of ice surface size on collision rates and head impacts at the World Junior Hockey Championships, 2002 to 2004. Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine : Official Journal of the Canadian Academy of Sport Medicine, 15(2), pp. 67-72.
Wennberg R. Effect of Ice Surface Size On Collision Rates and Head Impacts at the World Junior Hockey Championships, 2002 to 2004. Clin J Sport Med. 2005;15(2):67-72. PubMed PMID: 15782049.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of ice surface size on collision rates and head impacts at the World Junior Hockey Championships, 2002 to 2004. A1 - Wennberg,Richard, PY - 2005/3/23/pubmed PY - 2005/7/1/medline PY - 2005/3/23/entrez SP - 67 EP - 72 JF - Clinical journal of sport medicine : official journal of the Canadian Academy of Sport Medicine JO - Clin J Sport Med VL - 15 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine if collision rates and head impacts in elite junior hockey differed between games played on the small North American ice surface (85 ft wide), an intermediate-size Finnish ice surface (94 ft wide), and the large standard international ice surface (100 ft wide). DESIGN: Videotape analysis of all games involving Team Canada from the 2002 (large ice, Czech Republic), 2003 (small ice, Canada), and 2004 (intermediate ice, Finland) World Junior Championships. All collisions were counted and separated into various categories (volitional player/player bodychecks, into boards or open ice, plus accidental/incidental player/boards, player/ice, head/stick, head/puck). Further subdivisions included collisions involving the head directly or indirectly and notably severe head impacts. RESULTS: Small, intermediate, and large ice surface mean collisions/game, respectively, were 295, 258, 222, total collisions; 251, 220, 181, volitional bodychecks; 126, 115, 88, into boards; 125, 106, 93, open ice; 71, 52, 44, total head; 44, 36, 30, indirect head; 26, 16, 13, direct head; and 1.3, 0.5, 0.3, severe head (P < 0.05 for small-intermediate ice and intermediate-large ice differences in total collisions; P < 0.005 for small-large ice difference; P < 0.05 for small-intermediate ice differences in head impacts; P < 0.01 for small-large ice differences in total and severe head impacts). CONCLUSIONS: There is a significant inverse correlation between ice size and collision rates in elite hockey, including direct, indirect, and severe head impacts. These findings suggest that uniform usage of the larger international rinks could reduce the risk of injury, and specifically, concussions in elite hockey by decreasing the occurrence of collisions and head impacts. SN - 1050-642X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15782049/Effect_of_ice_surface_size_on_collision_rates_and_head_impacts_at_the_World_Junior_Hockey_Championships_2002_to_2004_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=15782049 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -