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Infrared radiation from an extrasolar planet.
Nature 2005; 434(7034):740-3Nat

Abstract

A class of extrasolar giant planets--the so-called 'hot Jupiters' (ref. 1)--orbit within 0.05 au of their primary stars (1 au is the Sun-Earth distance). These planets should be hot and so emit detectable infrared radiation. The planet HD 209458b (refs 3, 4) is an ideal candidate for the detection and characterization of this infrared light because it is eclipsed by the star. This planet has an anomalously large radius (1.35 times that of Jupiter), which may be the result of ongoing tidal dissipation, but this explanation requires a non-zero orbital eccentricity (approximately 0.03; refs 6, 7), maintained by interaction with a hypothetical second planet. Here we report detection of infrared (24 microm) radiation from HD 209458b, by observing the decrement in flux during secondary eclipse, when the planet passes behind the star. The planet's 24-microm flux is 55 +/- 10 microJy (1sigma), with a brightness temperature of 1,130 +/- 150 K, confirming the predicted heating by stellar irradiation. The secondary eclipse occurs at the midpoint between transits of the planet in front of the star (to within +/- 7 min, 1sigma), which means that a dynamically significant orbital eccentricity is unlikely.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Planetary Systems Laboratory and Goddard Center for Astrobiology, Code 693, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771, USA. Leo.D.Deming@nasa.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15785769

Citation

Deming, Drake, et al. "Infrared Radiation From an Extrasolar Planet." Nature, vol. 434, no. 7034, 2005, pp. 740-3.
Deming D, Seager S, Richardson LJ, et al. Infrared radiation from an extrasolar planet. Nature. 2005;434(7034):740-3.
Deming, D., Seager, S., Richardson, L. J., & Harrington, J. (2005). Infrared radiation from an extrasolar planet. Nature, 434(7034), pp. 740-3.
Deming D, et al. Infrared Radiation From an Extrasolar Planet. Nature. 2005 Apr 7;434(7034):740-3. PubMed PMID: 15785769.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Infrared radiation from an extrasolar planet. AU - Deming,Drake, AU - Seager,Sara, AU - Richardson,L Jeremy, AU - Harrington,Joseph, Y1 - 2005/03/23/ PY - 2005/02/03/received PY - 2005/02/28/accepted PY - 2005/3/24/pubmed PY - 2005/3/24/medline PY - 2005/3/24/entrez SP - 740 EP - 3 JF - Nature JO - Nature VL - 434 IS - 7034 N2 - A class of extrasolar giant planets--the so-called 'hot Jupiters' (ref. 1)--orbit within 0.05 au of their primary stars (1 au is the Sun-Earth distance). These planets should be hot and so emit detectable infrared radiation. The planet HD 209458b (refs 3, 4) is an ideal candidate for the detection and characterization of this infrared light because it is eclipsed by the star. This planet has an anomalously large radius (1.35 times that of Jupiter), which may be the result of ongoing tidal dissipation, but this explanation requires a non-zero orbital eccentricity (approximately 0.03; refs 6, 7), maintained by interaction with a hypothetical second planet. Here we report detection of infrared (24 microm) radiation from HD 209458b, by observing the decrement in flux during secondary eclipse, when the planet passes behind the star. The planet's 24-microm flux is 55 +/- 10 microJy (1sigma), with a brightness temperature of 1,130 +/- 150 K, confirming the predicted heating by stellar irradiation. The secondary eclipse occurs at the midpoint between transits of the planet in front of the star (to within +/- 7 min, 1sigma), which means that a dynamically significant orbital eccentricity is unlikely. SN - 1476-4687 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15785769/Infrared_radiation_from_an_extrasolar_planet_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/nature03507 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -