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Weight change and mortality: the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study.
J Intern Med. 2005 Apr; 257(4):338-45.JI

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

The prevalence of obesity is increasing. Overweight and obese people have increased mortality compared with normal weight people. We investigated the effect of weight change on mortality.

DESIGN

Prospective population study.

SETTING

We utilized data from two large population-based health studies conducted in 1984-86 and 1995-97 respectively. Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate mortality rate ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) between people with a stable weight and people who lost or gained weight. Subjects. Totally 20,542 men and 23,712 women aged 20 years or more, without cardiovascular disease or diabetes at the first survey and without a history of cancer at the second survey were followed up on all-cause mortality for 5 years after the second survey.

RESULTS

We found no association between weight gain and mortality. People who lost weight had a higher total mortality rate compared with those who were weight stable [RR was 1.6 (95% CI: 1.4-1.8) in men and 1.7 (95% CI: 1.5-2.0) in women]. Similar associations were found for cardiovascular and noncardiovascular mortality. Additional analysis showed a linear increase in mortality rates across categories of weight loss for both men and women (P < 0.001). There was a statistically significant interaction between weight change and initial BMI, but only amongst men (P = 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS

Weight loss, but not weight gain, was associated with increased mortality amongst men and women. Although underlying undiagnosed disease is the most plausible explanation for this finding, the similar associations found for total mortality, cardiovascular mortality, and noncardiovascular mortality makes the causal pathway somewhat enigmatic.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, University Medical Centre, N-7489 Trondheim, Norway. wenche.b.droyvold@medisin.ntnu.noNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15788003

Citation

Drøyvold, W B., et al. "Weight Change and Mortality: the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study." Journal of Internal Medicine, vol. 257, no. 4, 2005, pp. 338-45.
Drøyvold WB, Lund Nilsen TI, Lydersen S, et al. Weight change and mortality: the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study. J Intern Med. 2005;257(4):338-45.
Drøyvold, W. B., Lund Nilsen, T. I., Lydersen, S., Midthjell, K., Nilsson, P. M., Nilsson, J. A., & Holmen, J. (2005). Weight change and mortality: the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study. Journal of Internal Medicine, 257(4), 338-45.
Drøyvold WB, et al. Weight Change and Mortality: the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study. J Intern Med. 2005;257(4):338-45. PubMed PMID: 15788003.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Weight change and mortality: the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study. AU - Drøyvold,W B, AU - Lund Nilsen,T I, AU - Lydersen,S, AU - Midthjell,K, AU - Nilsson,P M, AU - Nilsson,J-A, AU - Holmen,J, AU - ,, PY - 2005/3/25/pubmed PY - 2005/5/6/medline PY - 2005/3/25/entrez SP - 338 EP - 45 JF - Journal of internal medicine JO - J. Intern. Med. VL - 257 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVES: The prevalence of obesity is increasing. Overweight and obese people have increased mortality compared with normal weight people. We investigated the effect of weight change on mortality. DESIGN: Prospective population study. SETTING: We utilized data from two large population-based health studies conducted in 1984-86 and 1995-97 respectively. Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate mortality rate ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) between people with a stable weight and people who lost or gained weight. Subjects. Totally 20,542 men and 23,712 women aged 20 years or more, without cardiovascular disease or diabetes at the first survey and without a history of cancer at the second survey were followed up on all-cause mortality for 5 years after the second survey. RESULTS: We found no association between weight gain and mortality. People who lost weight had a higher total mortality rate compared with those who were weight stable [RR was 1.6 (95% CI: 1.4-1.8) in men and 1.7 (95% CI: 1.5-2.0) in women]. Similar associations were found for cardiovascular and noncardiovascular mortality. Additional analysis showed a linear increase in mortality rates across categories of weight loss for both men and women (P < 0.001). There was a statistically significant interaction between weight change and initial BMI, but only amongst men (P = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Weight loss, but not weight gain, was associated with increased mortality amongst men and women. Although underlying undiagnosed disease is the most plausible explanation for this finding, the similar associations found for total mortality, cardiovascular mortality, and noncardiovascular mortality makes the causal pathway somewhat enigmatic. SN - 0954-6820 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15788003/Weight_change_and_mortality:_the_Nord_Trøndelag_Health_Study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2796.2005.01458.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -