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How does action resist visual illusion? Uncorrected oculomotor information does not account for accurate pointing in peripersonal space.
Exp Brain Res. 2005 Apr; 162(2):133-44.EB

Abstract

Using spatially identical displays (variants of the Müller-Lyer illusion), we compared the accuracy of spatial verbal judgments with that of saccadic (eye) and pointing (hand) movements. Verbal judgments showed a clear effect of the illusion. The amplitude of the primary saccade from one endpoint of the pattern (at fixation) to the other also showed an effect of the illusion. Conversely, movement amplitudes when pointing from one endpoint (initial finger position) to the other were significantly more accurate than both saccades and verbal responses. In a control experiment in which the viewing conditions between the saccade and pointing experiments were equalized, saccade amplitude was again affected by the illusion. In several studies, systematic biases in conscious spatial judgments have been contrasted with accurate open-loop pointing in peripersonal space. It has been proposed that such seeming dissociations between vision-for-action and vision-for-consciousness might in fact be because of a simple oculomotor strategy: saccade to the target before it disappears, then use the efference copy of the (accurate) saccadic movement to drive pointing. The present data do not support the hypothesis in this simple form.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Dipartimento di Psicologia and BRAIN Center for Neuroscience, Università di Trieste, Trieste, Italy. bernardis@psico.units.itNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15791463

Citation

Bernardis, Paolo, et al. "How Does Action Resist Visual Illusion? Uncorrected Oculomotor Information Does Not Account for Accurate Pointing in Peripersonal Space." Experimental Brain Research, vol. 162, no. 2, 2005, pp. 133-44.
Bernardis P, Knox P, Bruno N. How does action resist visual illusion? Uncorrected oculomotor information does not account for accurate pointing in peripersonal space. Exp Brain Res. 2005;162(2):133-44.
Bernardis, P., Knox, P., & Bruno, N. (2005). How does action resist visual illusion? Uncorrected oculomotor information does not account for accurate pointing in peripersonal space. Experimental Brain Research, 162(2), 133-44.
Bernardis P, Knox P, Bruno N. How Does Action Resist Visual Illusion? Uncorrected Oculomotor Information Does Not Account for Accurate Pointing in Peripersonal Space. Exp Brain Res. 2005;162(2):133-44. PubMed PMID: 15791463.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - How does action resist visual illusion? Uncorrected oculomotor information does not account for accurate pointing in peripersonal space. AU - Bernardis,Paolo, AU - Knox,Paul, AU - Bruno,Nicola, Y1 - 2004/12/10/ PY - 2003/12/16/received PY - 2004/09/12/accepted PY - 2005/3/26/pubmed PY - 2005/6/29/medline PY - 2005/3/26/entrez SP - 133 EP - 44 JF - Experimental brain research JO - Exp Brain Res VL - 162 IS - 2 N2 - Using spatially identical displays (variants of the Müller-Lyer illusion), we compared the accuracy of spatial verbal judgments with that of saccadic (eye) and pointing (hand) movements. Verbal judgments showed a clear effect of the illusion. The amplitude of the primary saccade from one endpoint of the pattern (at fixation) to the other also showed an effect of the illusion. Conversely, movement amplitudes when pointing from one endpoint (initial finger position) to the other were significantly more accurate than both saccades and verbal responses. In a control experiment in which the viewing conditions between the saccade and pointing experiments were equalized, saccade amplitude was again affected by the illusion. In several studies, systematic biases in conscious spatial judgments have been contrasted with accurate open-loop pointing in peripersonal space. It has been proposed that such seeming dissociations between vision-for-action and vision-for-consciousness might in fact be because of a simple oculomotor strategy: saccade to the target before it disappears, then use the efference copy of the (accurate) saccadic movement to drive pointing. The present data do not support the hypothesis in this simple form. SN - 0014-4819 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15791463/How_does_action_resist_visual_illusion_Uncorrected_oculomotor_information_does_not_account_for_accurate_pointing_in_peripersonal_space_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-004-2121-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -