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Pelvic floor muscle training is effective in women with urinary incontinence after stroke: a randomised, controlled and blinded study.
Neurourol Urodyn 2005; 24(4):348-57NU

Abstract

AIMS

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Pelvic Floor Muscle Training (PFMT) in women with urinary incontinence (UI) after ischemic stroke.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Three hundred and thirty-nine medical records of stroke patients were searched. Twenty-six subjects were randomised to a Treatment Group (14 subjects) or a Control Group (12 subjects) in a single blinded, randomised study. The intervention included 12 weeks of standardised PFMT. The outcome measures were: (1) diary recording the frequency of voiding, the number of incontinence episodes and used pads; (2) 24-hr home pad test; and (3) vaginal palpation of pelvic floor muscle evaluating function, strength, static and dynamic endurance.

RESULTS

Twenty-four subjects with urge, stress and mixed stress/urge incontinence, completed the study, 12 in each group. A significant improvement in frequency of voiding in daytime (Treatment Group/Control Group: 7/8 at pre-test, 6/9 at post-test (median values), P=0.018), 24-hr pad test (Treatment Group/Control Group: 8/12 to 2/8 g P=0.013) and dynamic endurance of pelvic floor muscle (Treatment Group/Control Group: 11/20 to 20/8 contractions of Pelvic Floor Muscle, P=0.028) was demonstrated in the Treatment Group compared to the Control Group. A significant improvement in frequency of voiding in daytime (decreased from seven to six, P=0.036), pelvic floor muscle function (P=0.034), strength (P=0.046), static endurance increased from 9 to 30 sec (P=0.028) and dynamic endurance increased from 11 to 20 contractions (P=0.020) was also demonstrated within the Treatment Group, but not in the Control Group.

CONCLUSION

PFMT had a significant effect in women with UI after stroke measured by diaries, pad tests and vaginal palpation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Geriatrics and Rheumatology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Glostrup, Denmark. Sigrid.Tibaek@get2net.dkNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15791633

Citation

Tibaek, Sigrid, et al. "Pelvic Floor Muscle Training Is Effective in Women With Urinary Incontinence After Stroke: a Randomised, Controlled and Blinded Study." Neurourology and Urodynamics, vol. 24, no. 4, 2005, pp. 348-57.
Tibaek S, Gard G, Jensen R. Pelvic floor muscle training is effective in women with urinary incontinence after stroke: a randomised, controlled and blinded study. Neurourol Urodyn. 2005;24(4):348-57.
Tibaek, S., Gard, G., & Jensen, R. (2005). Pelvic floor muscle training is effective in women with urinary incontinence after stroke: a randomised, controlled and blinded study. Neurourology and Urodynamics, 24(4), pp. 348-57.
Tibaek S, Gard G, Jensen R. Pelvic Floor Muscle Training Is Effective in Women With Urinary Incontinence After Stroke: a Randomised, Controlled and Blinded Study. Neurourol Urodyn. 2005;24(4):348-57. PubMed PMID: 15791633.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Pelvic floor muscle training is effective in women with urinary incontinence after stroke: a randomised, controlled and blinded study. AU - Tibaek,Sigrid, AU - Gard,Gunvor, AU - Jensen,Rigmor, PY - 2005/3/26/pubmed PY - 2005/8/24/medline PY - 2005/3/26/entrez SP - 348 EP - 57 JF - Neurourology and urodynamics JO - Neurourol. Urodyn. VL - 24 IS - 4 N2 - AIMS: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Pelvic Floor Muscle Training (PFMT) in women with urinary incontinence (UI) after ischemic stroke. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Three hundred and thirty-nine medical records of stroke patients were searched. Twenty-six subjects were randomised to a Treatment Group (14 subjects) or a Control Group (12 subjects) in a single blinded, randomised study. The intervention included 12 weeks of standardised PFMT. The outcome measures were: (1) diary recording the frequency of voiding, the number of incontinence episodes and used pads; (2) 24-hr home pad test; and (3) vaginal palpation of pelvic floor muscle evaluating function, strength, static and dynamic endurance. RESULTS: Twenty-four subjects with urge, stress and mixed stress/urge incontinence, completed the study, 12 in each group. A significant improvement in frequency of voiding in daytime (Treatment Group/Control Group: 7/8 at pre-test, 6/9 at post-test (median values), P=0.018), 24-hr pad test (Treatment Group/Control Group: 8/12 to 2/8 g P=0.013) and dynamic endurance of pelvic floor muscle (Treatment Group/Control Group: 11/20 to 20/8 contractions of Pelvic Floor Muscle, P=0.028) was demonstrated in the Treatment Group compared to the Control Group. A significant improvement in frequency of voiding in daytime (decreased from seven to six, P=0.036), pelvic floor muscle function (P=0.034), strength (P=0.046), static endurance increased from 9 to 30 sec (P=0.028) and dynamic endurance increased from 11 to 20 contractions (P=0.020) was also demonstrated within the Treatment Group, but not in the Control Group. CONCLUSION: PFMT had a significant effect in women with UI after stroke measured by diaries, pad tests and vaginal palpation. SN - 0733-2467 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15791633/Pelvic_floor_muscle_training_is_effective_in_women_with_urinary_incontinence_after_stroke:_a_randomised_controlled_and_blinded_study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/nau.20134 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -