Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Otologic disease in turner syndrome.
Otol Neurotol. 2005 Mar; 26(2):145-50.ON

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

This study involved the assessment of the otologic and audiologic characteristics of a group of patients with Turner syndrome.

STUDY DESIGN

Prospective study consisting of a questionnaire (77 of 123 responders) and an otologic and audiologic evaluation in patients with Turner syndrome (41 participants).

SETTING

Tertiary academic medical setting.

PATIENTS

Children, adolescents, and adults with Turner syndrome (median age, 24 yr).

INTERVENTIONS

Otomicroscopy, audiometry, immittance measurements, and diagnostic imaging.

RESULTS

Otologic disease is an important characteristic in Turner syndrome. Sixty-six percent of the patients studied via the questionnaire reported a history of chronic or recurrent middle ear disease. Analysis of audiometric data in 40 patients tested reveals an equal amount of normal ears (38.8%) and pure sensorineural ears (38.8%), each constituting approximately one-third of the patient population. Pure conductive losses represent only one-fifth (21.3%) of auditory abnormality encountered.

CONCLUSIONS

Careful follow-up during early childhood of children with Turner syndrome is necessary to detect middle ear disease and prevent sequelae. However, long-term periodic review is mandatory even after resolution of middle ear disease to detect sensorineural hearing loss.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium. ingeborg.dhooge@ugent.beNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15793396

Citation

Dhooge, Ingeborg J M., et al. "Otologic Disease in Turner Syndrome." Otology & Neurotology : Official Publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology, vol. 26, no. 2, 2005, pp. 145-50.
Dhooge IJ, De Vel E, Verhoye C, et al. Otologic disease in turner syndrome. Otol Neurotol. 2005;26(2):145-50.
Dhooge, I. J., De Vel, E., Verhoye, C., Lemmerling, M., & Vinck, B. (2005). Otologic disease in turner syndrome. Otology & Neurotology : Official Publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology, 26(2), 145-50.
Dhooge IJ, et al. Otologic Disease in Turner Syndrome. Otol Neurotol. 2005;26(2):145-50. PubMed PMID: 15793396.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Otologic disease in turner syndrome. AU - Dhooge,Ingeborg J M, AU - De Vel,E, AU - Verhoye,C, AU - Lemmerling,M, AU - Vinck,B, PY - 2005/3/29/pubmed PY - 2005/9/13/medline PY - 2005/3/29/entrez SP - 145 EP - 50 JF - Otology & neurotology : official publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology JO - Otol Neurotol VL - 26 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: This study involved the assessment of the otologic and audiologic characteristics of a group of patients with Turner syndrome. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective study consisting of a questionnaire (77 of 123 responders) and an otologic and audiologic evaluation in patients with Turner syndrome (41 participants). SETTING: Tertiary academic medical setting. PATIENTS: Children, adolescents, and adults with Turner syndrome (median age, 24 yr). INTERVENTIONS: Otomicroscopy, audiometry, immittance measurements, and diagnostic imaging. RESULTS: Otologic disease is an important characteristic in Turner syndrome. Sixty-six percent of the patients studied via the questionnaire reported a history of chronic or recurrent middle ear disease. Analysis of audiometric data in 40 patients tested reveals an equal amount of normal ears (38.8%) and pure sensorineural ears (38.8%), each constituting approximately one-third of the patient population. Pure conductive losses represent only one-fifth (21.3%) of auditory abnormality encountered. CONCLUSIONS: Careful follow-up during early childhood of children with Turner syndrome is necessary to detect middle ear disease and prevent sequelae. However, long-term periodic review is mandatory even after resolution of middle ear disease to detect sensorineural hearing loss. SN - 1531-7129 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15793396/Otologic_disease_in_turner_syndrome_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/00129492-200503000-00003 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -