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Nasal obstruction and sleep-disordered breathing: a study using acoustic rhinometry.
Am J Rhinol. 2005 Jan-Feb; 19(1):33-9.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The relationship between nasal airway function and sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) remains unclear. Although correction of nasal obstruction can significantly improve nighttime breathing in some patients, nasal obstruction may not play a role in all cases of SDB. An effective method of stratifying these patients is needed. Acoustic rhinometry (AR) is a reliable, noninvasive method of measuring the dimensions of the nasal airway.

METHODS

In 44 patients, we performed acoustic rhinometric measurements of nasal airway cross-sectional area, followed by hospital-based polysomnography and nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) level titration. We compared anatomic nasal obstruction to perceived nasal obstruction, as well as respiratory distress index and nCPAP titration level, using the Pearson correlation and multiple linear regression analysis within body mass index groups.

RESULTS

Perceived nasal obstruction correlated significantly with objective anatomic obstruction as measured by AR (r = 0.45, p < 0.01). For certain subgroup analyses in patients with a body mass index below 25, AR measurements correlated significantly with both nCPAP titration pressure (r = 0.85, p < 0.01) and respiratory distress index (r = 0.67, p = 0,03).

CONCLUSION

Nasal airway function may be a significant component of SDB in some patients, perhaps playing a larger role in patients who are not overweight. The best responders to nasal surgery for SDB may be nonoverweight patients with nasal obstruction. AR along with nasal examination may be helpful in the evaluation and treatment of the SDB patient.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York 10016, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15794072

Citation

Morris, Luc G., et al. "Nasal Obstruction and Sleep-disordered Breathing: a Study Using Acoustic Rhinometry." American Journal of Rhinology, vol. 19, no. 1, 2005, pp. 33-9.
Morris LG, Burschtin O, Lebowitz RA, et al. Nasal obstruction and sleep-disordered breathing: a study using acoustic rhinometry. Am J Rhinol. 2005;19(1):33-9.
Morris, L. G., Burschtin, O., Lebowitz, R. A., Jacobs, J. B., & Lee, K. C. (2005). Nasal obstruction and sleep-disordered breathing: a study using acoustic rhinometry. American Journal of Rhinology, 19(1), 33-9.
Morris LG, et al. Nasal Obstruction and Sleep-disordered Breathing: a Study Using Acoustic Rhinometry. Am J Rhinol. 2005;19(1):33-9. PubMed PMID: 15794072.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Nasal obstruction and sleep-disordered breathing: a study using acoustic rhinometry. AU - Morris,Luc G, AU - Burschtin,Omar, AU - Lebowitz,Richard A, AU - Jacobs,Joseph B, AU - Lee,Kelvin C, PY - 2005/3/30/pubmed PY - 2005/6/24/medline PY - 2005/3/30/entrez SP - 33 EP - 9 JF - American journal of rhinology JO - Am J Rhinol VL - 19 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: The relationship between nasal airway function and sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) remains unclear. Although correction of nasal obstruction can significantly improve nighttime breathing in some patients, nasal obstruction may not play a role in all cases of SDB. An effective method of stratifying these patients is needed. Acoustic rhinometry (AR) is a reliable, noninvasive method of measuring the dimensions of the nasal airway. METHODS: In 44 patients, we performed acoustic rhinometric measurements of nasal airway cross-sectional area, followed by hospital-based polysomnography and nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) level titration. We compared anatomic nasal obstruction to perceived nasal obstruction, as well as respiratory distress index and nCPAP titration level, using the Pearson correlation and multiple linear regression analysis within body mass index groups. RESULTS: Perceived nasal obstruction correlated significantly with objective anatomic obstruction as measured by AR (r = 0.45, p < 0.01). For certain subgroup analyses in patients with a body mass index below 25, AR measurements correlated significantly with both nCPAP titration pressure (r = 0.85, p < 0.01) and respiratory distress index (r = 0.67, p = 0,03). CONCLUSION: Nasal airway function may be a significant component of SDB in some patients, perhaps playing a larger role in patients who are not overweight. The best responders to nasal surgery for SDB may be nonoverweight patients with nasal obstruction. AR along with nasal examination may be helpful in the evaluation and treatment of the SDB patient. SN - 1050-6586 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15794072/Nasal_obstruction_and_sleep_disordered_breathing:_a_study_using_acoustic_rhinometry_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/sleepapnea.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -