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Resting EEG theta activity predicts cognitive performance in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.

Abstract

Quantitative electroencephalography has contributed significantly to elucidating the neurobiologic mechanisms of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. The most consistent and robust electroencephalographic disturbance in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder has been abnormally increased theta band during resting conditions. Separate research using attention-demanding tests has elucidated cognitive disturbances that differentiate attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. This study attempts to integrate electroencephalographic and neuropsychological indices to determine whether cognitive performance is specifically related to increased theta. Theta activity was recorded during a resting condition for 46 children/adolescents with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and their sex- and age-matched control subjects. Accuracy and reaction time during an auditory oddball and a visual continuous performance test were then recorded. Compared with control subjects, the attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder group manifested significantly increased (primarily left) frontal theta. Furthermore, the attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder group scored significantly delayed reaction time and decreased accuracy in both tasks. Correlation analysis revealed a significant relationship between frontal (primarily left) theta and oddball accuracy for the attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder group compared with a significant relationship between posterior (primarily right) theta and reaction time in the continuous performance test for the control group. These results indicate that spatial neurophysiologic deficits in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder may be related to disturbances in signal detection. This observation has important implications for the role of trait-like biologic deficits in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder predicting performance in information processing.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    The Brain Dynamics Centre, Westmead Hospital, NSW, Australia; School of Psychology, University of Sydney, NSW, Australia.

    , , , ,

    Source

    Pediatric neurology 32:4 2005 Apr pg 248-56

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
    Child
    Cognition
    Female
    Frontal Lobe
    Humans
    Male
    Neuropsychological Tests
    Predictive Value of Tests
    Theta Rhythm

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    15797181

    Citation

    Hermens, Daniel F., et al. "Resting EEG Theta Activity Predicts Cognitive Performance in Attention-deficit Hyperactivity Disorder." Pediatric Neurology, vol. 32, no. 4, 2005, pp. 248-56.
    Hermens DF, Soei EX, Clarke SD, et al. Resting EEG theta activity predicts cognitive performance in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Pediatr Neurol. 2005;32(4):248-56.
    Hermens, D. F., Soei, E. X., Clarke, S. D., Kohn, M. R., Gordon, E., & Williams, L. M. (2005). Resting EEG theta activity predicts cognitive performance in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Pediatric Neurology, 32(4), pp. 248-56.
    Hermens DF, et al. Resting EEG Theta Activity Predicts Cognitive Performance in Attention-deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. Pediatr Neurol. 2005;32(4):248-56. PubMed PMID: 15797181.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Resting EEG theta activity predicts cognitive performance in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. AU - Hermens,Daniel F, AU - Soei,Eleonore X C, AU - Clarke,Simon D, AU - Kohn,Michael R, AU - Gordon,Evian, AU - Williams,Leanne M, PY - 2004/05/26/received PY - 2004/11/29/accepted PY - 2005/3/31/pubmed PY - 2005/6/14/medline PY - 2005/3/31/entrez SP - 248 EP - 56 JF - Pediatric neurology JO - Pediatr. Neurol. VL - 32 IS - 4 N2 - Quantitative electroencephalography has contributed significantly to elucidating the neurobiologic mechanisms of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. The most consistent and robust electroencephalographic disturbance in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder has been abnormally increased theta band during resting conditions. Separate research using attention-demanding tests has elucidated cognitive disturbances that differentiate attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. This study attempts to integrate electroencephalographic and neuropsychological indices to determine whether cognitive performance is specifically related to increased theta. Theta activity was recorded during a resting condition for 46 children/adolescents with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and their sex- and age-matched control subjects. Accuracy and reaction time during an auditory oddball and a visual continuous performance test were then recorded. Compared with control subjects, the attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder group manifested significantly increased (primarily left) frontal theta. Furthermore, the attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder group scored significantly delayed reaction time and decreased accuracy in both tasks. Correlation analysis revealed a significant relationship between frontal (primarily left) theta and oddball accuracy for the attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder group compared with a significant relationship between posterior (primarily right) theta and reaction time in the continuous performance test for the control group. These results indicate that spatial neurophysiologic deficits in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder may be related to disturbances in signal detection. This observation has important implications for the role of trait-like biologic deficits in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder predicting performance in information processing. SN - 0887-8994 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15797181/Resting_EEG_theta_activity_predicts_cognitive_performance_in_attention_deficit_hyperactivity_disorder_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0887-8994(04)00565-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -