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Contribution of impaired glucose tolerance in subjects with the metabolic syndrome: Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging.
Metabolism. 2005 Apr; 54(4):542-7.M

Abstract

BACKGROUND

In addition to fasting plasma glucose (FPG), we examined the contribution of the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in the prevalence of subjects with the metabolic syndrome (MS).

METHODS AND RESULTS

Study participants were white adults in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging who underwent a fasting 2-hour OGTT. In men between the ages of 20 to 39, 40 to 59, 60 to 79, and 80 to 95 years, the prevalence of the MS by Adult Treatment Panel (ATP) III criteria (which excludes OGTT) was 11%, 28%, 32%, and 15%, respectively; whereas in women the prevalence was 5%, 12%, 24%, and 16%, respectively. If the current ATPIII dysglycemia criteria also included a 2-hour postchallenge glucose (2hPG) of 7.8 mmol/L or higher, the prevalence of the MS increased from 25% to 33% in men and from 15% to 21% in women (P<.0001). In study participants with FPG less than 5.6 mmol/L, the prevalence of the MS increased from 16% to 23% in men and from 9% to 13% in women. In men between the ages of 20 to 39, 40 to 59, 60 to 79, and 80 to 95 years and FPG less than 5.6 mmol/L, the prevalence of the MS increased to 15%, 32%, 40%, and 29%, respectively (P<.005 for men between 40 and 95 years of age), with inclusion of an abnormal 2hPG. In women between the ages of 20 to 39, 40 to 59, 60 to 79, and 80 to 95 years and FPG less than 5.6 mmol/L, the prevalence of the MS increased to 7%, 14%, 33%, and 31%, respectively, with inclusion of an abnormal 2hPG (P<.001 for women between 60 and 95 years of age).

CONCLUSION

The prevalence of the MS is significantly underestimated when the current ATPIII criteria of FPG 6.1 mmol/L or higher is the only determinant of dysglycemia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA. arodrig5@jhmi.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15798964

Citation

Rodriguez, Annabelle, et al. "Contribution of Impaired Glucose Tolerance in Subjects With the Metabolic Syndrome: Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging." Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, vol. 54, no. 4, 2005, pp. 542-7.
Rodriguez A, Muller DC, Engelhardt M, et al. Contribution of impaired glucose tolerance in subjects with the metabolic syndrome: Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. Metabolism. 2005;54(4):542-7.
Rodriguez, A., Muller, D. C., Engelhardt, M., & Andres, R. (2005). Contribution of impaired glucose tolerance in subjects with the metabolic syndrome: Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, 54(4), 542-7.
Rodriguez A, et al. Contribution of Impaired Glucose Tolerance in Subjects With the Metabolic Syndrome: Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. Metabolism. 2005;54(4):542-7. PubMed PMID: 15798964.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Contribution of impaired glucose tolerance in subjects with the metabolic syndrome: Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. AU - Rodriguez,Annabelle, AU - Muller,Denis C, AU - Engelhardt,Martin, AU - Andres,Reubin, PY - 2005/3/31/pubmed PY - 2005/5/27/medline PY - 2005/3/31/entrez SP - 542 EP - 7 JF - Metabolism: clinical and experimental JO - Metabolism VL - 54 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: In addition to fasting plasma glucose (FPG), we examined the contribution of the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in the prevalence of subjects with the metabolic syndrome (MS). METHODS AND RESULTS: Study participants were white adults in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging who underwent a fasting 2-hour OGTT. In men between the ages of 20 to 39, 40 to 59, 60 to 79, and 80 to 95 years, the prevalence of the MS by Adult Treatment Panel (ATP) III criteria (which excludes OGTT) was 11%, 28%, 32%, and 15%, respectively; whereas in women the prevalence was 5%, 12%, 24%, and 16%, respectively. If the current ATPIII dysglycemia criteria also included a 2-hour postchallenge glucose (2hPG) of 7.8 mmol/L or higher, the prevalence of the MS increased from 25% to 33% in men and from 15% to 21% in women (P<.0001). In study participants with FPG less than 5.6 mmol/L, the prevalence of the MS increased from 16% to 23% in men and from 9% to 13% in women. In men between the ages of 20 to 39, 40 to 59, 60 to 79, and 80 to 95 years and FPG less than 5.6 mmol/L, the prevalence of the MS increased to 15%, 32%, 40%, and 29%, respectively (P<.005 for men between 40 and 95 years of age), with inclusion of an abnormal 2hPG. In women between the ages of 20 to 39, 40 to 59, 60 to 79, and 80 to 95 years and FPG less than 5.6 mmol/L, the prevalence of the MS increased to 7%, 14%, 33%, and 31%, respectively, with inclusion of an abnormal 2hPG (P<.001 for women between 60 and 95 years of age). CONCLUSION: The prevalence of the MS is significantly underestimated when the current ATPIII criteria of FPG 6.1 mmol/L or higher is the only determinant of dysglycemia. SN - 0026-0495 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15798964/Contribution_of_impaired_glucose_tolerance_in_subjects_with_the_metabolic_syndrome:_Baltimore_Longitudinal_Study_of_Aging_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0026049504004342 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -