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Glycemic index of potatoes commonly consumed in North America.
J Am Diet Assoc 2005; 105(4):557-62JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the effect of variety and cooking method on glycemic response and glycemic index of common North American potatoes.

DESIGN

Study 1: subjects consumed 200 g Russet or white potatoes that were either (a) precooked, refrigerated, and reheated (precooked) or (b) cooked and consumed immediately (day-cooked). Incremental area under the curve was determined. Study 2: subjects consumed 50 g carbohydrate portions of white bread or potatoes (six different varieties and two different cooking methods). Glycemic index values were calculated. In both studies meals were consumed after a 10- to 12-hour overnight fast and finger-prick capillary-blood glucose was measured before and at intervals for 2 hours after consumption.

SUBJECTS

The study groups were as follows: Study 1 comprised four men and six women, aged 20 to 44 and Study 2 comprised 11 men and one woman, aged 18 to 50.

STATISTICAL ANALYSES

Repeated measures analysis of variance with Newman-Kuels to protect for multiple comparisons (criterion of significance two-tailed P <.05).

RESULTS

Study 1: Precooked Russet potatoes elicited lower area under the curve than day-cooked (P <.05), while precooking had no effect on boiled white potatoes. Study 2: The glycemic index values of potatoes varied significantly, depending on the variety and cooking method used (P =.003) ranging from intermediate (boiled red potatoes consumed cold: 56) to moderately high (roasted California white potatoes: 72; baked US Russet potatoes: 77) to high (instant mashed potatoes: 88; boiled red potatoes: 89).

CONCLUSIONS

The glycemic index of potatoes is influenced by variety and method of cooking and US Russet potatoes have only a moderately high glycemic index. Individuals who wish to minimize dietary glycemic index can be advised to precook potatoes and consume them cold or reheated.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E2, Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15800557

Citation

Fernandes, Glen, et al. "Glycemic Index of Potatoes Commonly Consumed in North America." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 105, no. 4, 2005, pp. 557-62.
Fernandes G, Velangi A, Wolever TM. Glycemic index of potatoes commonly consumed in North America. J Am Diet Assoc. 2005;105(4):557-62.
Fernandes, G., Velangi, A., & Wolever, T. M. (2005). Glycemic index of potatoes commonly consumed in North America. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 105(4), pp. 557-62.
Fernandes G, Velangi A, Wolever TM. Glycemic Index of Potatoes Commonly Consumed in North America. J Am Diet Assoc. 2005;105(4):557-62. PubMed PMID: 15800557.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Glycemic index of potatoes commonly consumed in North America. AU - Fernandes,Glen, AU - Velangi,Amogh, AU - Wolever,Thomas M S, PY - 2005/4/1/pubmed PY - 2005/5/13/medline PY - 2005/4/1/entrez SP - 557 EP - 62 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 105 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of variety and cooking method on glycemic response and glycemic index of common North American potatoes. DESIGN: Study 1: subjects consumed 200 g Russet or white potatoes that were either (a) precooked, refrigerated, and reheated (precooked) or (b) cooked and consumed immediately (day-cooked). Incremental area under the curve was determined. Study 2: subjects consumed 50 g carbohydrate portions of white bread or potatoes (six different varieties and two different cooking methods). Glycemic index values were calculated. In both studies meals were consumed after a 10- to 12-hour overnight fast and finger-prick capillary-blood glucose was measured before and at intervals for 2 hours after consumption. SUBJECTS: The study groups were as follows: Study 1 comprised four men and six women, aged 20 to 44 and Study 2 comprised 11 men and one woman, aged 18 to 50. STATISTICAL ANALYSES: Repeated measures analysis of variance with Newman-Kuels to protect for multiple comparisons (criterion of significance two-tailed P <.05). RESULTS: Study 1: Precooked Russet potatoes elicited lower area under the curve than day-cooked (P <.05), while precooking had no effect on boiled white potatoes. Study 2: The glycemic index values of potatoes varied significantly, depending on the variety and cooking method used (P =.003) ranging from intermediate (boiled red potatoes consumed cold: 56) to moderately high (roasted California white potatoes: 72; baked US Russet potatoes: 77) to high (instant mashed potatoes: 88; boiled red potatoes: 89). CONCLUSIONS: The glycemic index of potatoes is influenced by variety and method of cooking and US Russet potatoes have only a moderately high glycemic index. Individuals who wish to minimize dietary glycemic index can be advised to precook potatoes and consume them cold or reheated. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15800557/Glycemic_index_of_potatoes_commonly_consumed_in_North_America_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002822305000040 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -