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Measuring bronchodilation in COPD clinical trials.
Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2005 Apr; 59(4):379-84.BJ

Abstract

AIMS

The aim of this study was to compare the variability and sensitivity of impulse oscillometry (R5, X5 and RF), plethysmography (Raw and sGaw) and spirometry (FEV1, FVC and MMEF) in order to determine the most powerful technique for assessing bronchodilation in COPD clinical trials.

METHODS

Twenty-four patients with COPD had impulse oscillometry, plethysmography and spirometry measured twice 30 mins apart, to determine variability. Then ascending doses of salbutamol (20, 50, 100, 200, 400 and 800 microg) were given and the same measurements made after each dose. Significant changes greater than variability were determined for each performed measurement (expressed as mean percentage improvement with 95% CI).

RESULTS

Significant effects (P < 0.05) were detected after 20 microg by X5 (18.5% CI 9.8-27.2) RF (11.1% CI 7.2-15.0) and sGaw (21.5% CI 10.1-32.9), and after 50 microg by R5 (16.7% CI 10.8-22.5) and Raw (19.7% CI 13.0-26.4). FEV1 was less sensitive, detecting significant bronchodilation at 100 microg (10.2% CI 7.4-12.9).

CONCLUSIONS

We conclude that impulse oscillometry and plethysmography should be considered the preferred techniques for measuring bronchodilation in COPD clinical trials.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Medicines Evaluation Unit, North-west Lung Centre, Wythenshawe Hospital, Manchester, UK. zborrill@meu.org.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15801931

Citation

Borrill, Z L., et al. "Measuring Bronchodilation in COPD Clinical Trials." British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, vol. 59, no. 4, 2005, pp. 379-84.
Borrill ZL, Houghton CM, Woodcock AA, et al. Measuring bronchodilation in COPD clinical trials. Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2005;59(4):379-84.
Borrill, Z. L., Houghton, C. M., Woodcock, A. A., Vestbo, J., & Singh, D. (2005). Measuring bronchodilation in COPD clinical trials. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, 59(4), 379-84.
Borrill ZL, et al. Measuring Bronchodilation in COPD Clinical Trials. Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2005;59(4):379-84. PubMed PMID: 15801931.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Measuring bronchodilation in COPD clinical trials. AU - Borrill,Z L, AU - Houghton,C M, AU - Woodcock,A A, AU - Vestbo,J, AU - Singh,D, PY - 2005/4/2/pubmed PY - 2005/8/2/medline PY - 2005/4/2/entrez SP - 379 EP - 84 JF - British journal of clinical pharmacology JO - Br J Clin Pharmacol VL - 59 IS - 4 N2 - AIMS: The aim of this study was to compare the variability and sensitivity of impulse oscillometry (R5, X5 and RF), plethysmography (Raw and sGaw) and spirometry (FEV1, FVC and MMEF) in order to determine the most powerful technique for assessing bronchodilation in COPD clinical trials. METHODS: Twenty-four patients with COPD had impulse oscillometry, plethysmography and spirometry measured twice 30 mins apart, to determine variability. Then ascending doses of salbutamol (20, 50, 100, 200, 400 and 800 microg) were given and the same measurements made after each dose. Significant changes greater than variability were determined for each performed measurement (expressed as mean percentage improvement with 95% CI). RESULTS: Significant effects (P < 0.05) were detected after 20 microg by X5 (18.5% CI 9.8-27.2) RF (11.1% CI 7.2-15.0) and sGaw (21.5% CI 10.1-32.9), and after 50 microg by R5 (16.7% CI 10.8-22.5) and Raw (19.7% CI 13.0-26.4). FEV1 was less sensitive, detecting significant bronchodilation at 100 microg (10.2% CI 7.4-12.9). CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that impulse oscillometry and plethysmography should be considered the preferred techniques for measuring bronchodilation in COPD clinical trials. SN - 0306-5251 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15801931/Measuring_bronchodilation_in_COPD_clinical_trials_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2125.2004.02261.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -