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Phospholipase A2-dependent effects of the venom from the New Guinean small-eyed snake Micropechis ikaheka.
Muscle Nerve. 2005 Jul; 32(1):81-7.MN

Abstract

The New Guinean small-eyed snake (Micropechis ikaheka) is a cause of life-threatening envenoming. Previous studies on M. ikaheka venom have indicated the presence of neurotoxins as well as myotoxins. This study examined the in vitro myotoxic effects of M. ikaheka venom and the efficacy of a polyvalent antivenom in neutralizing these effects. Venom (50 microg/ml) produced a slowly developing contracture and inhibition of direct twitches of the chick biventer cervicis nerve-muscle preparation in the presence of tubocurarine (10 microM). Myotoxicity was confirmed by subsequent histological examination of tissues. This myotoxicity was prevented by the prior addition of polyvalent snake antivenom (30 U/ml). However, the addition of antivenom (30 U/ml) 1 h after venom administration failed to reverse or prevent the further inhibition of direct twitches. In addition, venom (1-10 microg/ml) produced concentration-dependent contractions of the guinea-pig isolated ileum. These effects were dependent on phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity of the venom as evidenced by the ability of the PLA2 inhibitor 4-bromophenacyl bromide (4-BPB; 1.8 mM) to prevent this activity. This study indicates that M. ikaheka venom causes significant myotoxicity and that polyvalent snake antivenom may be a potential treatment for the myotoxic effects in patients envenomed by this species.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Monash Venom Group, Department of Pharmacology, Building 13E, Monash University, Victoria 3800, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15803483

Citation

Kuruppu, Sanjaya, et al. "Phospholipase A2-dependent Effects of the Venom From the New Guinean Small-eyed Snake Micropechis Ikaheka." Muscle & Nerve, vol. 32, no. 1, 2005, pp. 81-7.
Kuruppu S, Isbister GK, Hodgson WC. Phospholipase A2-dependent effects of the venom from the New Guinean small-eyed snake Micropechis ikaheka. Muscle Nerve. 2005;32(1):81-7.
Kuruppu, S., Isbister, G. K., & Hodgson, W. C. (2005). Phospholipase A2-dependent effects of the venom from the New Guinean small-eyed snake Micropechis ikaheka. Muscle & Nerve, 32(1), 81-7.
Kuruppu S, Isbister GK, Hodgson WC. Phospholipase A2-dependent Effects of the Venom From the New Guinean Small-eyed Snake Micropechis Ikaheka. Muscle Nerve. 2005;32(1):81-7. PubMed PMID: 15803483.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Phospholipase A2-dependent effects of the venom from the New Guinean small-eyed snake Micropechis ikaheka. AU - Kuruppu,Sanjaya, AU - Isbister,Geoffrey K, AU - Hodgson,Wayne C, PY - 2005/4/2/pubmed PY - 2005/8/3/medline PY - 2005/4/2/entrez SP - 81 EP - 7 JF - Muscle & nerve JO - Muscle Nerve VL - 32 IS - 1 N2 - The New Guinean small-eyed snake (Micropechis ikaheka) is a cause of life-threatening envenoming. Previous studies on M. ikaheka venom have indicated the presence of neurotoxins as well as myotoxins. This study examined the in vitro myotoxic effects of M. ikaheka venom and the efficacy of a polyvalent antivenom in neutralizing these effects. Venom (50 microg/ml) produced a slowly developing contracture and inhibition of direct twitches of the chick biventer cervicis nerve-muscle preparation in the presence of tubocurarine (10 microM). Myotoxicity was confirmed by subsequent histological examination of tissues. This myotoxicity was prevented by the prior addition of polyvalent snake antivenom (30 U/ml). However, the addition of antivenom (30 U/ml) 1 h after venom administration failed to reverse or prevent the further inhibition of direct twitches. In addition, venom (1-10 microg/ml) produced concentration-dependent contractions of the guinea-pig isolated ileum. These effects were dependent on phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity of the venom as evidenced by the ability of the PLA2 inhibitor 4-bromophenacyl bromide (4-BPB; 1.8 mM) to prevent this activity. This study indicates that M. ikaheka venom causes significant myotoxicity and that polyvalent snake antivenom may be a potential treatment for the myotoxic effects in patients envenomed by this species. SN - 0148-639X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15803483/Phospholipase_A2_dependent_effects_of_the_venom_from_the_New_Guinean_small_eyed_snake_Micropechis_ikaheka_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/mus.20334 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -