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A multicenter study of complementary and alternative medicine usage among ED patients.
Acad Emerg Med. 2005 Apr; 12(4):377-80.AE

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To estimate the prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) usage among emergency department (ED) patients.

METHODS

This study was a cross-sectional study in four Boston-area EDs. For two 24-hour periods, the authors interviewed consecutive patients age 18 and older about whether they had ever used or had recently (within the past year) used CAM "remedies" (e.g., herbal treatments) or "therapies" (e.g., chiropractic). The authors also asked about the patient's disclosure of CAM usage to allopathic health care providers.

RESULTS

Of 978 patients, 752 patients were eligible. Among these, 539 (72%) were interviewed. Of these patients, ever having used CAM was reported by 57% (95% CI = 52% to 61%), and 37% (95% CI = 33% to 41%) reported use in the past year. In a multivariate model of recent CAM usage, independent predictors were younger age, higher education level, and chronic pain. Patients who spoke Spanish as their primary language were less likely to report CAM usage. Disclosure of CAM usage to allopathic providers was low, yet >80% reported that they would be comfortable discussing their CAM usage with allopathic providers.

CONCLUSIONS

CAM usage was common among ED patients enrolled in our study, despite underreporting to ED staff. Given the growing evidence of benefits and hazards from popular CAM remedies and therapies, ED staff should consider raising this health issue with their patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Director, EMNet Coordinating Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, 326 Cambridge Street, Suite 410, Boston, MA 02114, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15805333

Citation

Kim, Sunghye, et al. "A Multicenter Study of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Usage Among ED Patients." Academic Emergency Medicine : Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine, vol. 12, no. 4, 2005, pp. 377-80.
Kim S, Hohrmann JL, Clark S, et al. A multicenter study of complementary and alternative medicine usage among ED patients. Acad Emerg Med. 2005;12(4):377-80.
Kim, S., Hohrmann, J. L., Clark, S., Munoz, K. N., Braun, J. E., Doshi, A., Radeos, M. S., & Camargo, C. A. (2005). A multicenter study of complementary and alternative medicine usage among ED patients. Academic Emergency Medicine : Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine, 12(4), 377-80.
Kim S, et al. A Multicenter Study of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Usage Among ED Patients. Acad Emerg Med. 2005;12(4):377-80. PubMed PMID: 15805333.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A multicenter study of complementary and alternative medicine usage among ED patients. AU - Kim,Sunghye, AU - Hohrmann,Jessica L, AU - Clark,Sunday, AU - Munoz,Karla N, AU - Braun,Josef E, AU - Doshi,Arpi, AU - Radeos,Michael S, AU - Camargo,Carlos A,Jr PY - 2005/4/5/pubmed PY - 2005/5/13/medline PY - 2005/4/5/entrez SP - 377 EP - 80 JF - Academic emergency medicine : official journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine JO - Acad Emerg Med VL - 12 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To estimate the prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) usage among emergency department (ED) patients. METHODS: This study was a cross-sectional study in four Boston-area EDs. For two 24-hour periods, the authors interviewed consecutive patients age 18 and older about whether they had ever used or had recently (within the past year) used CAM "remedies" (e.g., herbal treatments) or "therapies" (e.g., chiropractic). The authors also asked about the patient's disclosure of CAM usage to allopathic health care providers. RESULTS: Of 978 patients, 752 patients were eligible. Among these, 539 (72%) were interviewed. Of these patients, ever having used CAM was reported by 57% (95% CI = 52% to 61%), and 37% (95% CI = 33% to 41%) reported use in the past year. In a multivariate model of recent CAM usage, independent predictors were younger age, higher education level, and chronic pain. Patients who spoke Spanish as their primary language were less likely to report CAM usage. Disclosure of CAM usage to allopathic providers was low, yet >80% reported that they would be comfortable discussing their CAM usage with allopathic providers. CONCLUSIONS: CAM usage was common among ED patients enrolled in our study, despite underreporting to ED staff. Given the growing evidence of benefits and hazards from popular CAM remedies and therapies, ED staff should consider raising this health issue with their patients. SN - 1553-2712 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15805333/A_multicenter_study_of_complementary_and_alternative_medicine_usage_among_ED_patients_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=1069-6563&date=2005&volume=12&issue=4&spage=377 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -