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Correlation between cough frequency and airway inflammation in children with primary ciliary dyskinesia.
Pediatr Pulmonol. 2005 Jun; 39(6):551-7.PP

Abstract

Cough is common in airway disease. We measured cough frequency in children with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD), to determine how accurately families assess this symptom; and to assess the relationship between cough frequency and airway inflammation, measured using induced sputum and exhaled nitric oxide (eNO). Twenty stable PCD children (7 boys), median age 10.8 years (interquartile range (IQR), 9-14), and 10 healthy control children, median age 12 years (IQR, 10.5-12.7), were recruited. ENO was measured using a chemiluminescence analyzer, with sputum induction with 3.5% saline. PCD children underwent ambulatory cough monitoring. Sputum neutrophils were higher in PCD (median, 70.3%; IQR, 55.3-78%) compared to controls (median, 27%; IQR, 24.5-33%; P = 0.004); cough frequency was higher (median episodes, 19; IQR, 11-22.5) compared to healthy children (median episodes, 6.7; IQR, 4.1-10.5; P < 0.001). Forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV(1) percent predicted) and eNO were lower in PCD (median, 63%; IQR, 57-85%; P < 0.0001); eNO (median, 7.1 ppb (IQR, 4.8-19.1 ppb) vs. 12.4 ppb (IQR, 10.3-17.3 ppb), P = 0.043). Parental scoring of day and night cough correlated with recorded cough (r = 0.930, P < 0.0001, daytime; r = 0.711 for nighttime, P = 0.002). Visual analogue score and cough episodes also correlated positively (r = 0.906; P < 0.0001). There was a positive correlation between cough frequency and sputum neutrophil count in PCD (Spearman's r = 0.693, P < 0.002), but not percent FEV(1) or eNO. Stable PCD children have increased cough frequency and neutrophilic airway inflammation. In conclusion, cough frequency correlated with sputum neutrophils but not with FEV1 or eNO.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Paediatric Respiratory Medicine, Imperial School of Medicine at National Heart and Lung Institute, Royal Brompton Hospital, London, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Controlled Clinical Trial
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15806596

Citation

Zihlif, Nadwa, et al. "Correlation Between Cough Frequency and Airway Inflammation in Children With Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia." Pediatric Pulmonology, vol. 39, no. 6, 2005, pp. 551-7.
Zihlif N, Paraskakis E, Lex C, et al. Correlation between cough frequency and airway inflammation in children with primary ciliary dyskinesia. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2005;39(6):551-7.
Zihlif, N., Paraskakis, E., Lex, C., Van de Pohl, L. A., & Bush, A. (2005). Correlation between cough frequency and airway inflammation in children with primary ciliary dyskinesia. Pediatric Pulmonology, 39(6), 551-7.
Zihlif N, et al. Correlation Between Cough Frequency and Airway Inflammation in Children With Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2005;39(6):551-7. PubMed PMID: 15806596.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Correlation between cough frequency and airway inflammation in children with primary ciliary dyskinesia. AU - Zihlif,Nadwa, AU - Paraskakis,Emmanouil, AU - Lex,Christiane, AU - Van de Pohl,Lauri-Ann, AU - Bush,Andrew, PY - 2005/4/5/pubmed PY - 2005/10/27/medline PY - 2005/4/5/entrez SP - 551 EP - 7 JF - Pediatric pulmonology JO - Pediatr Pulmonol VL - 39 IS - 6 N2 - Cough is common in airway disease. We measured cough frequency in children with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD), to determine how accurately families assess this symptom; and to assess the relationship between cough frequency and airway inflammation, measured using induced sputum and exhaled nitric oxide (eNO). Twenty stable PCD children (7 boys), median age 10.8 years (interquartile range (IQR), 9-14), and 10 healthy control children, median age 12 years (IQR, 10.5-12.7), were recruited. ENO was measured using a chemiluminescence analyzer, with sputum induction with 3.5% saline. PCD children underwent ambulatory cough monitoring. Sputum neutrophils were higher in PCD (median, 70.3%; IQR, 55.3-78%) compared to controls (median, 27%; IQR, 24.5-33%; P = 0.004); cough frequency was higher (median episodes, 19; IQR, 11-22.5) compared to healthy children (median episodes, 6.7; IQR, 4.1-10.5; P < 0.001). Forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV(1) percent predicted) and eNO were lower in PCD (median, 63%; IQR, 57-85%; P < 0.0001); eNO (median, 7.1 ppb (IQR, 4.8-19.1 ppb) vs. 12.4 ppb (IQR, 10.3-17.3 ppb), P = 0.043). Parental scoring of day and night cough correlated with recorded cough (r = 0.930, P < 0.0001, daytime; r = 0.711 for nighttime, P = 0.002). Visual analogue score and cough episodes also correlated positively (r = 0.906; P < 0.0001). There was a positive correlation between cough frequency and sputum neutrophil count in PCD (Spearman's r = 0.693, P < 0.002), but not percent FEV(1) or eNO. Stable PCD children have increased cough frequency and neutrophilic airway inflammation. In conclusion, cough frequency correlated with sputum neutrophils but not with FEV1 or eNO. SN - 8755-6863 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15806596/Correlation_between_cough_frequency_and_airway_inflammation_in_children_with_primary_ciliary_dyskinesia_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -