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Relationship between obesity and prostate cancer.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW

This review examines the relationship between obesity and prostate cancer, with an update of recent research in this field.

RECENT FINDINGS

A recent report of the Cancer Prevention Study II showed a direct relationship between increasing body mass index and prostate cancer mortality. However, the US Health Professionals Followup Study reported an inverse association between obesity and the risk of developing prostate cancer in men under 60 years of age or in those with a family history of prostate cancer. These studies illustrate the contradictory evidence linking obesity to prostate cancer risk and mortality. Body mass does not appear to affect the performance of prostate-specific antigen as a diagnostic test, and on prostate biopsy a lower body mass is associated with a higher cancer detection rate and a higher cancer volume as measured by core length involvement. In two recent radical prostatectomy series, obesity was associated with worse pathological features and higher biochemical recurrence rates. The higher risk of recurrence persisted in patients with organ-confined disease and negative surgical margins, implying that this risk is not related to surgical technique. Several potential biological mechanisms have been proposed to explain this link including hormonal alterations, hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, and elevated insulin-like growth factor and leptin levels.

SUMMARY

Recent literature provides evidence that obesity may promote the development of a more aggressive form of prostate cancer, resulting in higher recurrence rates after primary therapy and higher cancer mortality rates overall. The mechanism to explain the association between obesity and prostate cancer is unclear.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    Department of Urology, Naval Medical Center, San Diego, California 92134-5000, USA. clamling@nmcsd.med.navy.mil

    Source

    Current opinion in urology 15:3 2005 May pg 167-71

    MeSH

    Body Mass Index
    Comorbidity
    Humans
    Insulin Resistance
    Leptin
    Male
    Neoplasm Recurrence, Local
    Obesity
    Prostatectomy
    Prostatic Neoplasms
    Risk Assessment

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    15815193

    Citation

    Amling, Christopher L.. "Relationship Between Obesity and Prostate Cancer." Current Opinion in Urology, vol. 15, no. 3, 2005, pp. 167-71.
    Amling CL. Relationship between obesity and prostate cancer. Curr Opin Urol. 2005;15(3):167-71.
    Amling, C. L. (2005). Relationship between obesity and prostate cancer. Current Opinion in Urology, 15(3), pp. 167-71.
    Amling CL. Relationship Between Obesity and Prostate Cancer. Curr Opin Urol. 2005;15(3):167-71. PubMed PMID: 15815193.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Relationship between obesity and prostate cancer. A1 - Amling,Christopher L, PY - 2005/4/9/pubmed PY - 2005/8/27/medline PY - 2005/4/9/entrez SP - 167 EP - 71 JF - Current opinion in urology JO - Curr Opin Urol VL - 15 IS - 3 N2 - PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review examines the relationship between obesity and prostate cancer, with an update of recent research in this field. RECENT FINDINGS: A recent report of the Cancer Prevention Study II showed a direct relationship between increasing body mass index and prostate cancer mortality. However, the US Health Professionals Followup Study reported an inverse association between obesity and the risk of developing prostate cancer in men under 60 years of age or in those with a family history of prostate cancer. These studies illustrate the contradictory evidence linking obesity to prostate cancer risk and mortality. Body mass does not appear to affect the performance of prostate-specific antigen as a diagnostic test, and on prostate biopsy a lower body mass is associated with a higher cancer detection rate and a higher cancer volume as measured by core length involvement. In two recent radical prostatectomy series, obesity was associated with worse pathological features and higher biochemical recurrence rates. The higher risk of recurrence persisted in patients with organ-confined disease and negative surgical margins, implying that this risk is not related to surgical technique. Several potential biological mechanisms have been proposed to explain this link including hormonal alterations, hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, and elevated insulin-like growth factor and leptin levels. SUMMARY: Recent literature provides evidence that obesity may promote the development of a more aggressive form of prostate cancer, resulting in higher recurrence rates after primary therapy and higher cancer mortality rates overall. The mechanism to explain the association between obesity and prostate cancer is unclear. SN - 0963-0643 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15815193/Relationship_between_obesity_and_prostate_cancer_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=15815193 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -