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[Catatonia].
Psychiatr Prax. 2005 Apr; 32 Suppl 1:S7-24.PP

Abstract

Catatonia is a neuropsychiatric syndrome characterized by mental, motor and behavioral symptoms. It occurs in up to 18 % of acute admissions and is most frequently associated with affective and psychotic disorders. It is also seen in dissociative disorders, pervasive developmental disorders, mental retardation and organic psychiatric disorders. Catatonic syndromes are impressive states that can be reliably and validly diagnosed both clinically and with psychometric measurements and they can be treated effectively. Despite this, they are often not recognized in clinical practice, are not part of the therapeutic strategy and thus remain untreated. The following article is intended to give a review of the most pertinent questions related to the diagnosis and treatment of catatonia in order to improve clinicians' ability to recognize and treat catatonic symptoms and syndromes adequately.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Klinikum Chemnitz gGmbH, Klinik für Psychiatrie, Verhaltensmedizin und Psychosomatik, Chemnitz. p.braeunig@skc.deNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

English Abstract
Journal Article
Review

Language

ger

PubMed ID

15818516

Citation

Bräunig, Peter, and Stephanie Krüger. "[Catatonia]." Psychiatrische Praxis, vol. 32 Suppl 1, 2005, pp. S7-24.
Bräunig P, Krüger S. [Catatonia]. Psychiatr Prax. 2005;32 Suppl 1:S7-24.
Bräunig, P., & Krüger, S. (2005). [Catatonia]. Psychiatrische Praxis, 32 Suppl 1, S7-24.
Bräunig P, Krüger S. [Catatonia]. Psychiatr Prax. 2005;32 Suppl 1:S7-24. PubMed PMID: 15818516.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Catatonia]. AU - Bräunig,Peter, AU - Krüger,Stephanie, PY - 2005/4/9/pubmed PY - 2005/9/30/medline PY - 2005/4/9/entrez SP - S7 EP - 24 JF - Psychiatrische Praxis JO - Psychiatr Prax VL - 32 Suppl 1 N2 - Catatonia is a neuropsychiatric syndrome characterized by mental, motor and behavioral symptoms. It occurs in up to 18 % of acute admissions and is most frequently associated with affective and psychotic disorders. It is also seen in dissociative disorders, pervasive developmental disorders, mental retardation and organic psychiatric disorders. Catatonic syndromes are impressive states that can be reliably and validly diagnosed both clinically and with psychometric measurements and they can be treated effectively. Despite this, they are often not recognized in clinical practice, are not part of the therapeutic strategy and thus remain untreated. The following article is intended to give a review of the most pertinent questions related to the diagnosis and treatment of catatonia in order to improve clinicians' ability to recognize and treat catatonic symptoms and syndromes adequately. SN - 0303-4259 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15818516/[Catatonia]_ L2 - http://www.thieme-connect.com/DOI/DOI?10.1055/s-2004-834747 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -