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The use of wavelength-selective plastic cladding materials in horticulture: understanding of crop and fungal responses through the assessment of biological spectral weighting functions.
Photochem Photobiol. 2005 Sep-Oct; 81(5):1052-60.PP

Abstract

Plant responses to light spectral quality can be exploited to deliver a range of agronomically desirable end points in protected crops. This can be achieved using plastics with specific spectral properties as crop covers. We have studied the responses of a range of crops to plastics that have either (a) increased transmission of UV compared with standard horticultural covers, (b) decreased transmission of UV or (c) increased the ratio of red (R) : far-red (FR) radiation. Both the UV-transparent and R : FR increasing films reduced leaf area and biomass, offering potential alternatives to chemical growth regulators. The UV-opaque film increased growth, but while this may be useful in some crops, there were trade-offs with elements of quality, such as pigmentation and taste. UV manipulation may also influence disease control. Increasing UV inhibited not only the pathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea but also the disease biocontrol agent Trichoderma harzianum. Unlike B. cinerea, T. harzianum was highly sensitive to UV-A radiation. These fungal responses and those for plant growth in the growth room and the field under different plastics are analyzed in terms of alternative biological spectral weighting functions (BSWF). The role of BSWF in assessing general patterns of response to UV modification in horticulture is also discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Biological Sciences, Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK. n.paul@lancaster.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

15819600

Citation

Paul, Nigel D., et al. "The Use of Wavelength-selective Plastic Cladding Materials in Horticulture: Understanding of Crop and Fungal Responses Through the Assessment of Biological Spectral Weighting Functions." Photochemistry and Photobiology, vol. 81, no. 5, 2005, pp. 1052-60.
Paul ND, Jacobson RJ, Taylor A, et al. The use of wavelength-selective plastic cladding materials in horticulture: understanding of crop and fungal responses through the assessment of biological spectral weighting functions. Photochem Photobiol. 2005;81(5):1052-60.
Paul, N. D., Jacobson, R. J., Taylor, A., Wargent, J. J., & Moore, J. P. (2005). The use of wavelength-selective plastic cladding materials in horticulture: understanding of crop and fungal responses through the assessment of biological spectral weighting functions. Photochemistry and Photobiology, 81(5), 1052-60.
Paul ND, et al. The Use of Wavelength-selective Plastic Cladding Materials in Horticulture: Understanding of Crop and Fungal Responses Through the Assessment of Biological Spectral Weighting Functions. Photochem Photobiol. 2005 Sep-Oct;81(5):1052-60. PubMed PMID: 15819600.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The use of wavelength-selective plastic cladding materials in horticulture: understanding of crop and fungal responses through the assessment of biological spectral weighting functions. AU - Paul,Nigel D, AU - Jacobson,Rob J, AU - Taylor,Anna, AU - Wargent,Jason J, AU - Moore,Jason P, PY - 2005/4/12/pubmed PY - 2006/6/23/medline PY - 2005/4/12/entrez SP - 1052 EP - 60 JF - Photochemistry and photobiology JO - Photochem Photobiol VL - 81 IS - 5 N2 - Plant responses to light spectral quality can be exploited to deliver a range of agronomically desirable end points in protected crops. This can be achieved using plastics with specific spectral properties as crop covers. We have studied the responses of a range of crops to plastics that have either (a) increased transmission of UV compared with standard horticultural covers, (b) decreased transmission of UV or (c) increased the ratio of red (R) : far-red (FR) radiation. Both the UV-transparent and R : FR increasing films reduced leaf area and biomass, offering potential alternatives to chemical growth regulators. The UV-opaque film increased growth, but while this may be useful in some crops, there were trade-offs with elements of quality, such as pigmentation and taste. UV manipulation may also influence disease control. Increasing UV inhibited not only the pathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea but also the disease biocontrol agent Trichoderma harzianum. Unlike B. cinerea, T. harzianum was highly sensitive to UV-A radiation. These fungal responses and those for plant growth in the growth room and the field under different plastics are analyzed in terms of alternative biological spectral weighting functions (BSWF). The role of BSWF in assessing general patterns of response to UV modification in horticulture is also discussed. SN - 0031-8655 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/15819600/The_use_of_wavelength_selective_plastic_cladding_materials_in_horticulture:_understanding_of_crop_and_fungal_responses_through_the_assessment_of_biological_spectral_weighting_functions_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1562/2004-12-06-RA-392 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -